SEED
SEEDS




SEED

SEED DISPERSAL

HEIRLOOM PLANTS

HEIRLOOM PLANTS LINKS

SEED EXCHANGE

SEED EXCHANGE LINKS

SEED LINKS

SEED RESOURCES



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SECTION 1



SEED




A seed in some plants, referred to as a kernel, is a
small embryonic plant enclosed in a covering called
the seed coat, usually with some stored food. It is
the product of the ripened ovule of gymnosperm and
angiosperm plants which occurs after fertilization
and some growth within the mother plant.

The formation of the seed completes the process of
reproduction in seed plants (started with the
development of flowers and pollination), with the
embryo developed from the zygote and the seed coat
from the integuments of the ovule.

Seeds have been an important development in the
reproduction and spread of flowering plants,
relative to more primitive plants like mosses,
ferns and liverworts, which do not have seeds
and use other means to propagate themselves.

This can be seen by the success of seed plants
(both gymnosperms and angiosperms) in the
dominating biological niches on land, from
forests to grasslands both in hot and cold
climates.




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SECTION 2



SEED
DISPERSAL




Unlike animals, plants are limited in their ability
to seek out favorable conditions for life and growth.
As a consequence, plants have evolved many ways to
disperse their offspring by dispersing their seeds.

A seed must somehow "arrive" at a location and be
there at a time favorable for germination and growth.



By wind (anemochory)

Dandelion seeds (achenes) can be carried long
distances by the wind.Many seeds (e.g. maple,
pine) have a wing that aids in wind dispersal.
The dustlike seeds of orchids are carried
efficiently by the wind.

Some seeds, (e.g. dandelion, milkweed, poplar)
have hairs that aid in wind dispersal.



By water (hydrochory)

Some plants, such as Mucuna and Dioclea, produce
buoyant seeds termed sea-beans or drift seeds
because they float in rivers to the oceans and
wash up on beaches.



By animals (zoochory)

Seeds (burrs) with barbs or hooks (e.g. acaena,
burdock, dock which attach to animal fur or
feathers, and then drop off later.

Seeds with a fleshy covering (e.g. apple, cherry,
juniper) are eaten by animals (birds, mammals)
which then disperse these seeds in their droppings.

Seeds (nuts) which are an attractive long-term
storable food resource for animals (e.g. acorns,
hazelnut, walnut); the seeds are stored some
distance from the parent plant, and some escape
being eaten if the animal forgets them.



Myrmecochory

is the dispersal of seeds by ants.


SEED
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed



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SECTION 3



HEIRLOOM
PLANTS




Heirloom plant,
Heirloom variety,
Heirloom vegetable



Is an open-pollinated cultivar that was commonly
grown during earlier periods in human history,
but which is not used in modern large-scale
agriculture. Since most popular heirloom plants
are vegetables, the term heirloom vegetable is
often used instead.

The trend of growing heirloom plants in gardens
has been growing in popularity in the United
States and Europe over the last decade.

Before the industrialization of agriculture,
a much wider variety of plant foods was grown
for human consumption. In modern agriculture
in the industrialized world, most food crops
are now grown in large, monocultural plots.

In order to maximize consistency, few varieties
of each type of crop are grown. These varieties
are often selected for their productivity, their
ability to withstand mechanical picking and
cross-country shipping, and their tolerance to
drought, frost, or pesticides.

Nutrition, flavor, and variety are frequently
secondary and tertiary concerns, if a concern
at all.[citation needed] Heirloom gardening
can be seen as a reaction against this trend.



HEIRLOOM PLANT
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heirloom_plant



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SECTION 3A



HEIRLOOM
PLANT
LINKS




Heirlooms, the Garden Treasury
http://www.vegparadise.com/heirloom.html

Introduction to Heirloom Vegetables
http://www.gardenmandy.com/introduction-to-heirloom-vegetables/

Seed Savers Exchange
http://www.seedsavers.org

Seeds of Diversity Canada
http://www.seeds.ca

The Southern Bulb Co
http://www.southernbulbs.com

What is an heirloom vegetable?
http://www.halcyon.com/tmend/define.htm



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SECTION 4



SEED
EXCHANGE




The Seed Exchange provides a place where
users can offer seeds for trade and make
requests for seeds they are seeking.




Seed swaps are events where gardeners meet to exchange
seeds. Swapping can be arranged online or by mail,
especially when participants are spread out
geographically.

Swap meet events, where growers meet and exchange their
excess seeds in person, are also growing in popularity.
In part this is due to increased interest in organic
gardening and heritage or heirloom plant varietals.

This reflects gardeners' interest in "unusual or
particular varieties of flowers and vegetables,"
according to Kathy Jentz of Washington Gardener
Magazine (Maryland).

Seed swaps also help consumers who, due to increases
in the cost of living or cut down on expenditures,
wish to grow their own food.[3][4] Some events are
organized as part of an educational effort, where
visitors are taught gardening and growing skills
and how to preserve an area's cultural heritage
and biodiversity.



In the United States,
the last Saturday of
January is
"National Seed Swap Day.




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SEED
SWAP
DAY




Toledo, Ohio
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toledo,_Ohio

England
http://en.wikipedia.org//wiki/England

North Devon
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Devon

Brighton, England
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brighton

Athens, Georgia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athens,_Georgia

Claremont, California
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claremont,_California

Pasadena, California
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasadena,_California

Los Angeles, California
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Angeles,_California

Santa Barbara, California
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Barbara,_California

Tesuque, New Mexico
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesuque,_New_Mexico

Belen, New Mexico
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belen,_New_Mexico

Wheaton, Maryland
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Maryland

Portland, Oregon
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland,_Oregon

Salt Lake City, Utah
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_Lake_City,_Utah

Southampton, England
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southampton

Canada
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada


SEED EXCHANGE
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed_exchange



Organic gardening
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organic_gardening



Crop diversity
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crop_diversity




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SECTION 4A



SEED
EXCHANGE
LINKS




Acorn Intentional Community
http://www.acorncommunity.org/

AHS Seed Exchange
http://www.ahs.org/membership/seed_exchange.htm

Heritage Harvest Festival
http://www.HeritageHarvestFestival.com/

Online Seed Exchange
http://www.motherearthnews.com / Organic-Gardening / 2008-04-01 / Online-Seed-Exchange.aspx

Seed Exchange
http://www.heirloomseedswap.com/

Seed Savers Exchange
http://www.seedsavers.org/

Seed Savers, Seed Exchanges, Seed Societies
http://www.halcyon.com/tmend/exchanges.htm

Seed Swap National Gardening Association
http://www.garden.org/seedswap/

Southern Exposure Seed Exchange
http://www.southernexposure.com/



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SECTION 5



SEED
LINKS




Flavon's Secret Flower Garden
http://www.alpine-plants-jp.com/himitunohanazono/index_himitunohanazono_0.htm

GROW SEED
http://www.growseed.org

Guide To Saving Seeds From Your Favorite Vegetables
https://101gardening.blogspot.com/2017/08/guide-to-saving-seeds-from-your.html?fullpost

HEIRLOOM SEED
SAVERS ORGANIZATION

http://www.suite101.com

List of Common Botanical Seed Names
http://www.seedlab.co.nz/NAMESEED.HTM

The Millennium Seed Bank Project
http://www.kew.org/msbp/

Mother Earth Vews
http://www.motherearthnews.com/

Native Seeds
http://www.nativeseeds.org/

Oil Press
http://www.journeytoforever.org/biofuel_library/oilpress.html

Oil, press.
http://www.oilpress.com/test%20of%20seed.htm

Oil Seed Presses
http://www.oilseedspress.com/

Seed Alliance
https://seedalliance.org/

The Seed Biology Place
http://www.seedbiology.de/index.html

SEED OF CHANGE
http://www.seedsofchange.com

SEED SAVERS EXCHANGE
http://www.seedsavers.org

SEED SAVERS NETWORK
http://www.seedsavers.net

SEED SWAPPERS
http://www.seedswappers.com

The Svalbard Global Seed Vault
http://www.regjeringen.no/en/dep/lmd/campain/svalbard-global-seed-vault.html?id=462220

USDA National Organic Program
http://www.ams.usda.gov/nop/



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SECTION 6



SEED
RESOURCES




Biological dispersal
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_dispersal

Bhutanese red rice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhutanese_red_rice

Heirloom tomato
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heirloom_tomato

History of gardening
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_gardening

Forbidden rice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forbidden_rice

Germination
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germination

List of edible seeds
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_edible_seeds

List of organic gardening and farming topics
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_organic_gardening_and_farming_topics

Local food
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_food

Recalcitrant seed
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recalcitrant_seed

Seedbed
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seedbed

Seed company
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed_company

Seed orchard
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed_orchard

Seed predation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed_predation

Seedling
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seedling

Seed saving
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed_saving

Slow Food
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slow_Food

Stratification
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stratification_%28botany%29



CATEGORY PLANTS
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Plants




CATEGORY PLANT TAXONOMY
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Plant_taxonomy




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