GREENHOUSE
GLASSHOUSE
HOTHOUSE




GREENHOUSE

SHADEHOUSE

AEROPONICS

COLD FRAME

THE EDEN PROJECT

CLOSED ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS CES

ECOSPHERE

HYDROPONICS

MICROCLIMATE

VERTICAL FARMING

HERBARIUM

HERBARIUM LINKS

PLANT NURSERY

CONSERVATORY

GREENHOUSE LINKS



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SECTION 1



GREENHOUSE
GLASSHOUSE
HOTHOUSE




A greenhouse also called a glasshouse or hothouse
is a building where plants are cultivated.

A greenhouse is a structure with a glass or plastic
roof and frequently glass or plastic walls; it heats
up because incoming solar radiation from the sun
warms plants, soil, and other things inside the
building faster than heat can escape the structure.

Air warmed by the heat from hot interior surfaces
is retained in the building by the roof and wall.
These structures range in size from small sheds
to very large buildings.

Greenhouses are often used for growing flowers,
vegetables, fruits, and tobacco plants. Bumblebees
are the pollinators of choice for most greenhouse
pollination, although other types of bees have
been used, as well as artificial pollination.
This helps the plants to produce more offspring
for future plantations.

Greenhouses protect crops from too much heat or
cold,shield plants from dust storms and blizzards,
and help to keep out pests. Light and temperature
control allows greenhouses to turn inarable land
into arable land.

Greenhouses can feed starving nations where crops
can't survive in the harsh deserts and Arctic
wastes. Hydroponics can be used in greenhouses as
well to make the most use of the interior space.




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SECTION 2



SHADEHOUSE




A shadehouse serves the opposite purpose of
a greenhouse; it is used to protect cultivated
plants from excessive heat, light or dryness.



GREENHOUSE
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenhouse



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SECTION 3



AEROPONICS




Aeroponics is the process of growing plants in an air or mist environment
without the use of soil or an aggregate medium. Aeroponic culture differs
from both hydroponics and in-vitro (Plant tissue culture) growing.

Unlike hydroponics, which uses water as a growing medium and essential
minerals to sustain plant growth, aeroponics is conducted without a
growing medium.



AEROPONICS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeroponics



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SECTION 4



COLD
FRAME




In agriculture and gardening, a cold frame is a transparent-roofed
enclosure, built low to the ground, used to protect plants from cold
weather. The transparent top admits sunlight and prevents heat escape
via convection that would otherwise occur, particularly at night.
Essentially, a cold frame functions as a miniature greenhouse season
extension device.

Cold frames are found in home gardens and in vegetable farming. They
create microclimates that provide several degrees of air and soil
temperature insulation, and shelter from wind. In cold-winter regions,
these characteristics allow plants to be started earlier in the spring,
and to survive longer into the fall and winter. They are most often
used for growing seedlings that are later transplanted into open ground,
and can also be a permanent home to cold-hardy vegetables grown for
autumn and winter harvest.



COLD FRAME
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_frame



Types of
Greenhouse Plants

http://www.ehow.com/facts_4928196_types-greenhouse-plants.html





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SECTION 5



THE
EDEN
PROJECT




The Eden Project is a visitor attraction in the United Kingdom,
including the world's largest greenhouse. Inside the artificial
biomes are plants that are collected from all around the world.

The complex comprises a number of domes that house plant species
from around the world, each dome emulating a natural biome. The
domes are made out of hundreds of hexagons plus a few pentagons
that connect the whole construction; each of these is a
transparent cushion made of tough plastic.



THE EDEN PROJECT
https://en.wikipedia.org/Eden_project



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SECTION 6



CLOSED
ECOLOGICAL
SYSTEMS
CES




Closed ecological systems (CES) are ecosystems that do not rely
on matter exchange with any part outside the system.

Although the Earth itself fits this definition, the term is most
often used to describe much smaller manmade ecosystems. Such
systems are scientifically interesting and can potentially serve
as a life support system during space flights, in space stations
or space habitats.

In a closed ecological system, any waste products produced by one
species must be used by at least one other species. If the purpose
is to maintain a higher life form, such as a mouse or a human,
waste products such as carbon dioxide, faeces and urine must
eventually be converted into oxygen, food, and water.




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SECTION 6A



ECOSPHERE




An ecosphere is a glass enclosed, self-contained and self-sustaining
closed ecosystem sold primarily as a gift or experiment.

It can include tiny shrimp, algae, gravel, decorative shells,
and gorgonia.



CLOSED ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS CES
https://en.wikipedia.org/Closed_ecological_system



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SECTION 7



HYDROPONICS




Hydroponics (from the Greek words hydro water and ponos labor) is
a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, without
soil. Terrestrial plants may be grown with their roots in the mineral
nutrient solution only or in an inert medium, such as perlite, gravel,
or mineral wool.

Plant physiology researchers discovered in the 19th century that plants
absorb essential mineral nutrients as inorganic ions in water. In natural
conditions, soil acts as a mineral nutrient reservoir but the soil itself
is not essential to plant growth. When the mineral nutrients in the soil
dissolve in water, plant roots are able to absorb them. When the required
mineral nutrients are introduced into a plant's water supply artificially,
soil is no longer required for the plant to thrive. Almost any terrestrial
plant will grow with hydroponics. Hydroponics is also a standard technique
in biology research and teaching.



HYDROPONICS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydroponics



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SECTION 8



MICROCLIMATE




A microclimate is a local atmospheric zone where the climate differs
from the surrounding area. A small local area for example or the term
may refer to areas as small as a few square feet (for example a garden
bed) or as large as many square miles (for example a valley).

Microclimates exist, for example, near bodies of water which may cool
the local atmosphere, or in heavily urban areas where brick, concrete,
and asphalt absorb the sun's energy, heat up, and reradiate that heat
to the ambient air: the resulting urban heat island is a kind of
microclimate.

Another contributory factor to microclimate is the slope or aspect of
an area. South-facing slopes in the Northern Hemisphere and north-facing
slopes in the Southern Hemisphere are exposed to more direct sunlight
than opposite slopes and are therefore warmer for longer.



MICROCLIMATE
https://en.wikipedia.org/Microclimate



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SECTION 9



VERTICAL
FARMING




Vertical farming is a proposal to conduct large-scale agriculture
in urban high-rises or "farmscrapers". Using recycled resources
and greenhouse methods such as hydroponics, these buildings would
produce fruit, vegetables, edible mushrooms and algae year-round.
Their proponents argue that, by allowing traditional outdoor farms
to revert to a natural state and reducing the energy costs needed
to transport foods to consumers, vertical farms could significantly
alleviate climate change produced by excess atmospheric carbon.



VERTICAL FARMING
https://en.wikipedia.org/Vertical_Farming



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SECTION 10



HERBARIUM




In botany, a herbarium is a collection of preserved plant specimens.
These specimens may be whole plants or plant parts: these will usually
be in a dried form, mounted on a sheet, but depending upon the material
may also be kept in alcohol or other preservative. The same term is
often used in mycology to describe an equivalent collection of preserved
fungi.

The term can also refer to the building where the specimens are stored,
or the scientific institute that not only stores but researches these
specimens. The specimens in a herbarium are often used as reference
material in describing plant taxa; some specimens may be types.



HERBARIUM
https://en.wikipedia.org/Herbarium



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SECTION 10A



HERBARIUM
LINKS




Cofrin Center for Biodiversity
http://www.uwgb.edu/biodiversity/herbarium/

Harvard University Herbaria
http://www.huh.harvard.edu/

The Herbarium
http://www.theherbarium.com/

The Herbarium
http://www.herbarium.com/

Herbarium Supply
http://www.herbariumsupply.com/

LIST OF HERBARIUM
http://www.ibiblio.org/botnet/flora/wwwlist2.html

MBLWHOI Library: Herbarium
http://www.mblwhoilibrary.org/archives/herb/

Rocky Mountain Herbarium
http://www.rmh.uwyo.edu/

The USF Herbarium
http://www.plantatlas.usf.edu/isb/herbarium.htm

Virtual Herbarium
http://www.virtualherbarium.org/



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SECTION 11



PLANT
NURSERY




A nursery is a place where plants are propagated and grown to usable
size. There are retail nurseries which sell to the general public,
wholesale nurseries which sell only to other nurseries and to commercial
landscape gardeners, and private nurseries which supply the needs of
institutions or private estates. Some retail and wholesale nurseries sell
by mail.



PLANT NURSERY
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_nursery



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SECTION 12



CONSERVATORY




A conservatory is a glass and metal structure traditionally found
in the garden of a large house. Modern conservatories are smaller,
can be made of PVC and are often added to houses for home improvement
purposes. The traditional nineteenth century conservatory was a large
greenhouse used for growing tender and rare plants, or, less often,
for birds and rare animals - sometimes with the plants and animals
living together. Many cities, especially those in cold climates and
with large European populations have built municipal conservatories
to display tropical plants and to hold flower displays.



Conservatory
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservatory_%28greenhouse%29



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SECTION 13



GREENHOUSE
GREEN HOUSE
LINKS




4 Types of Greenhouse
http://www.doityourself.com/stry/4-types-of-greenhouse-plastic-to-use

Backyard Greenhouse
http://www.stretcher.com/stories/02/02jun03a.cfm

Basic Greenhouse Types and Uses
http://www.greenhousebuyersguide.com/types/

The Best Types of Greenhouses
http://www.gardenguides.com/99064-types-greenhouses.html

Build a greenhouse
http://www.sherrysgreenhouse.com/pages/structures/greenhouses-build.html

Building Greenhouses
http://www.woodworkersworkshop.com/resources/index.php?cat=445

Cold Frames and Hot Beds
http://www.savvygardener.com/Features/cold_frames-hotbeds.html

Different Types of Greenhouse Coverings
http://www.igcusa.com/Technical/coverings.html



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Do it yourself Greenhouse Plans
http://www.123-greenhouse-gardening.com/Greenhouse-Plans.html

Floorplans for a truly sustainable architecture
http://www.thenaturalhome.com/floorplan.htm

Free greenhouse plans
http://www.localphilosophy.com/blog/index.php/tag/free-greenhouse-plans/

Free Greenhouse Plans
http://www.free-woodworking-stuff.com/docs/plans/greenhouse-plans.htm

Free Solar Greenhouse Plans
http://www.hobby-greenhouse.com/FreeSolar.html

Free Stuff Home Garden Greenhouse
http://www.free-stuff.me.uk/free/home/garden/greenhouse/

Greenhouses EnviroCept
http://www.envirocept.com/

Greenhouse Designs, Blueprints, and Plans
http://www.h2ouse.com/html/plans.html

Greenhouse Fabrics
http://www.greenhousefabrics.com/

Greenhouse Gardener's Companion
http://www.greenhousegarden.com/kit.htm

Greenhouse Plans
http://www.freeplans.glenns-garden.com/?page_id=6



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Greenhouse Plans
http://www.mysheds.com/plans.shtml

Greenhouse Kits
http://www.growerssupply.com/

Greenhouse Structures
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu / depts / hort / greenhouse_veg / topics / gtp_pages /

Greenhouse Supplies and Greenhouse Information
http://www.greenhouse.net/

Greenhouse: Types
http://www.mamashealth.com/eco/greenhousetype.asp

Hobby greenhouses: types
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/ptlk/1313.html

Planning and Building a Greenhouse
http://www.wvu.edu/~Agexten/hortcult/greenhou/building.htm

Solar Greenhouses
http://www.alibaba.com/showroom/solar-greenhouses.html

Solar Greenhouses
http://www.roperld.com/science/solargreenhouses.htm

Solar Greenhouse Heat Sink
http://www.reuk.co.uk/Solar-Greenhouse-Heat-Sink.htm

Solar greenhouse plans
http://www.tradevv.com/vs-solar-greenhouse-plans/

Solar Sunspaces and Greenhouses
http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Sunspace/sunspaces.htm



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APPROPEDIA
SUSTAINABILITY
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

http://www.appropedia.org/




MIMI
https://en.mimi.hu/index.html




Readers
Digest

https://www.rd.com/




Farmers
Almanac

http://www.almanac.com/




Modern
Farmer

http://modernfarmer.com/




The Encyclopedia
of Life

http://eol.org/




PLANET KIDS
http://www.planetkids.biz/




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