BEANS




July 3
NATIONAL EAT
YOUR BEANS DAY

https://nationaldaycalendar.com/national-eat-your-beans-day-july-3/




FACTS ABOUT BEAN PLANTS

BEAN RELATED TOPICS

CAN BEANS GROW
ALONGSIDE OTHER VEGETABLES?


GROWING BEANS RELATED TOPICS

BEAN LINKS



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SECTION 1



FACTS ABOUT
BEAN PLANTS




Beans of all shapes, sizes and colors are an excellent source of vitamins,
minerals, protein and fiber. Since prehistoric times, beans have been a
source of sustenance for humans and animals alike. Today, beans are grown
and consumed in massive amounts all over the world. From mouth-watering
southern-style baked beans to delicate steamed haricots verts served with
lemon and butter, beans provide a wealth of flavor and health benefits.



Defining Beans

Beans are actually just the seeds that grow the bean plant. Some of the beans
eaten as ripened seeds include adzuki, anasazi, black, cranberry, garbanzo,
kidney and pinto. Green, or snap, beans are unripened seeds of any bean plant.
There are over 130 varieties of snap beans, which can be green, red, yellow or
purple in color and a variety of widths and lengths.



Propagation of Beans

The most effective method of propagating beans is to collect the seeds after the
plant has matured. To harvest seeds for snap, lima, fava or other beans that are
eaten before the plant matures, some pods are left on the plant to dry. Usually
six weeks after the last harvest of edible beans, the plants are pulled up whole
and the bean seeds are removed from the pods by a process of threshing and cleaning.



Growth Cycle of Bean Plants

Germination (sprouting) of bean seeds takes five to seven days. It takes roughly six
weeks from the time of planting until it reaches the flowering stage. The flowering
stage is the time when the bean plants pollinate themselves in order to produce the
bean pods. Once the blooms wither, bean pods begin to form and are typically ready
for edible harvest within two weeks. Determinate (bush variety) bean plants will
produce one or two rounds of edible harvest while indeterminate (pole variety) bean
plants will continue to produce bean pods throughout the growing cycle.



Bean Plant Care

Water, sunlight, and the occasional dose of fertilizer are essential to healthy,
productive bean plants. Before planting, an application of a 5-10-10 fertilizer
at a rate of one cup every 50 feet should be worked into the soil. After plants
are established and blooming has ensued, another application may be applied along
the rows and worked into the soil with water. Too much nitrogen, however, should
be avoided as it will result in lots of leaves and very few beans. Beans need at
least 1 inch of water per week, but excess moisture should be avoided because it
can cause blossom drop and poorly formed beans. Mulching around the base of each
plant is recommended to retain even moisture levels and prevent weeds.



Bugs in the Beans

While some insects may be beneficial to the plant world, there are a host of pests
that can wreak havoc on bean plants. Aphids, bean beetles, leafminers, thrips, stink
bugs, borers and spider mites can chew through the blossoms, leaves and stems of the
bean plant. Some insects, such as aphids, can even transport diseases that will
further injure the bean crop. Removal of dead plant debris and regular tilling can
help to control the insect population in the garden setting. There are also a wide
variety of insecticides that can be used to destroy and deter further infestations.



Common Bean Plant Diseases

There are a host of bacterial and fungal diseases that can attack and decimate bean
crops. Rust, bacterial blight, root rot, bean common mosaic virus and white mold can
attack the leaves, beans and roots of the plant. Crop rotation, proper moisture levels
and fungicides can help to prevent or alleviate these infestations.



Facts About Bean Plants
http://www.gardenguides.com/94379-bean-plants.html



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SECTION 2



BEAN
RELATED
TOPICS




Bean Plant Characteristics
https://www.gardenguides.com/118217-bean-plant-characteristics.html

How to Plant Bean Seeds
https://www.gardenguides.com/77602-plant-bean-seeds.html

What Do Bean Plants Need to Grow?
https://www.gardenguides.com/12480264-what-do-bean-plants-need-to-grow.html

Stringless Pole Beans
https://www.gardenguides.com/127064-stringless-pole-beans.html



Bean
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bean




list of
Edible
Seeds

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_edible_seeds




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SECTION 3



CAN BEANS
GROW ALONGSIDE
OTHER VEGETABLES?




Shell beans and snap beans are all members of the legume family. Of these two kinds
of beans, there are hundreds of different varieties, some which grow as bushes, while
other grow as vines which require trellising for support. When planning your garden
space, it is important to know which plants are companions of beans, and create a
mutually beneficial relationship. Beans generally grow well and can be planted
alongside many different vegetables; however, there are a few combinations to avoid.



Nitrogen Fixers

The most common nutrient deficiency that occurs in the garden is a lack of nitrogen.
Nitrogen is an essential nutrient, and plants utilize a lot of it. Adding beans to
your garden is a way to improve and add an extra boost of nitrogen to your soil.
Beans are nitrogen fixers, meaning, they remove nitrogen from the atmosphere and store
it in nodules in their root system. The roots of other plants growing in the vicinity
are able to take in and use this nitrogen to aid their health and growth. For this
reason, it is a good idea to plant beans next to heavy-feeding plants, such as potatoes
(Solanum tuberosum), corn (Zea mays) or squash (Cucurbita spp.).



Companion Planting

Beans grow well with other vegetables that are known to be companion plants. Companion
planting is a gardening technique which has been utilized for centuries to improve plant
growth and crop yield. Although it is not an exact science, companion planting places
mutually beneficial plants in close proximity in order to decrease competition for water
and nutrients, improve crop flavor and health, and award off various pests and diseases.

The Native Americans developed a classic companion plant combination, using corn, pole
beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and squash. A symbiotic relationship is created with these
three plants as corn provides a support structure for growing pole beans, and pole beans
provide added nitrogen for heavy-feeding corn and squash. Other vegetable companions of
beans include cucumbers (Cucumis sativus), celery (Apium graveolens), eggplant
(Solanum melongena), peas (Pisum sativum) and potatoes.



Interplanting

Interplanting is another planting technique where beans benefit other vegetables in your
garden by maximizing the number of crops you can grow in the same space. Interplanting
techniques place fast-growing crops in the planting spaces between slower-growing crops,
like beans. Beans perform well when interplanted with various greens like kale
(Brassica oleracea), Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla), lettuce (Lactuca sativa)
and spinach (Spinacia oleracea). By the time your fast-growing greens are ready for harvest;
your bean plants will have not yet reached maturity. This means that you do not have to
worry about your beans competing with or stealing sunlight from interplanted crops.



Combinations to Avoid

Companion planting tells us that there are certain plants which benefit each other, while
other plant combinations detract from each otherís flavor, crop yield and overall health.
Certain chemicals in the plantís leaves and root system do not do well together in the
same growing space. For example, bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and pole beans should
never be planted with members of the onion family (Allium spp.). Never plant pole beans
with sunflowers (Helianthus annuus). Although the height of the sunflower seems like it
would make a good support structure of growing pole beans, these plants do not perform
well together. Additionally, pole beans do not perform well with beets (Beta vulgaris)
or Kohlrabi ( Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes).



Can Beans Grow Alongside Other Vegetables?
https://www.ehow.com/info_12294721_can-beans-grow-alongside-other-vegetables.html



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SECTION 4



GROWING BEANS
RELATED
TOPICS




Growing Beans
https://www.ehow.com/home/plants-flowers-herbs/growing-beans/

Growing Beans & Tomatoes Together
https://www.ehow.com/info_12305933_growing-beans-tomatoes-together.html

Which Vegetables Grow Best Near Other Vegetables?
https://www.ehow.com/info_8098211_vegetables-grow-near-other-vegetables.html

August Vegetable Planting Schedule
https://www.ehow.com/info_8062904_august-vegetable-planting-schedule.html

How to Harvest Butter Beans
https://www.ehow.com/how_7311961_harvest-butter-beans.html

When to Plant Green Beans in Zone 7
https://www.ehow.com/info_12284744_plant-green-beans-zone-7.html

The Minimum Amount of Sun for a Vegetable Garden
https://www.ehow.com/facts_7700190_minimum-amount-sun-vegetable-garden.html

How to Snap Bush Beans
https://www.ehow.com/how_8188226_snap-bush-beans.html

How to Care for Bush Snap Beans
https://www.ehow.com/how_5544366_care-bush-snap-beans.html

How Often Should I Water My Snap Beans?
https://www.ehow.com/info_8432676_should-water-snap-beans.html

How to Grow Snap Green Beans
https://www.ehow.com/how_6397208_grow-snap-green-beans.html

How to Harvest and Store Shell Beans
https://www.ehow.com/how_8590_harvest-store-shell.html



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US
Dry Bean
Council

https://www.usdrybeans.com/




How to
Grow
Beans and Peas

https://www.wikihow.com/Grow-Beans-and-Peas




What are
Bean Sprouts?

https://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-bean-sprouts.htm




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SECTION 5



BEAN
LINKS




The 9 Healthiest Beans
and Legumes You Can Eat

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/healthiest-beans-legumes

Beans
http://www.almanac.com/plant/beans

Bean Growing Guide
https://www.almanac.com/plant/beans

Beans A Growing Guide
http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/beans

Bean Sprouts
http://www.sproutpeople.com/seed/beans.html

Celebrate the Three Sisters:
Corn, Beans and Squash

http://www.reneesgarden.com/articles/3sisters.html

Certain Plants Know How to Help Their Neighbors
http://www.unce.unr.edu/resources/horticulture/growyourown/files/pdf/GrowYourOwn14.pdf

Companion and Interplanting
http://www.garden.org/ediblelandscaping/?page=201005-interplanting

Cook's Thesaurus on Beans
http://www.foodsubs.com/Beans.html

Dry Edible Beans
http://www.northern-crops.com/northern-region-crops-of-the-northen-us/2014/3/23/dry-edible-beans

Fermentation improves nutritional value of beans
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2621.2006.01506.x

Growing Sprouts For Profit
http://www.seedsofsustainability.org/growing-sprouts/growing-sprouts-for-profit-step1/

How to Grow and Harvest Pole Beans
https://happydiyhome.com/pole-beans/

Interplanting Crops in the Vegetable Garden
http://www.vegetablegardener.com/item/11167/interplanting-crops-in-the-vegetable-garden

Learn to grow Beans
http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/beans

Life Cycle of a Bean Plant
http://www.buzzle.com/articles/life-cycle-of-bean-plant.html

Pole Beans
https://happydiyhome.com/pole-beans/

Sprout Recipes
http://www.sproutkitchen.com/

Sprout Nutrition Information
http://www.sproutkitchen.com/sprout-nutrition-info/sprout-nutrition-information

Tips For Growing Beans
http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/beans/tips-for-growing-beans.htm



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Make
soil
loose

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/make-soil-loose-23694.html




Agriculture
http://wiki.terrafirmacraft.com/Agriculture




World
Crops
Database

https://world-crops.com/home/




CROP
INDEX

https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/Indices/index_ab.html




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The Encyclopedia
of Life

http://eol.org/




List of
Fruits

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fruits




Plants Database
National Gardening Association
http://garden.org/plants/




The Plant
Encyclopedia

http://theplantencyclopedia.org/wiki/Main_Page




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