ZERO
WASTE




ZERO WASTE

ZERO WASTE VS RECYCLING

ZERO WASTE ALLIANCE

CRADLE TO CRADLE

CRADLE TO CRADLE LINKS

GOOD ELECTRONIC PRODUCT MANAGEMENT

OBSOLESCENCE

PLANNED OBSOLESCENCE

PLANNED OBSOLESCENCE LINKS

ZERO WASTE LINKS



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SECTION 1



ZERO
WASTE




Zero waste is a philosophy that encourages the
redesign of resource-use systems in such a way
that waste is reduced to zero.

Put simply, zero waste extends current approaches
to recycling by introducing the concept of circular
systems in which as much waste as possible is reused,
similar to the way that resources are reused in nature.

The zero-waste strategy is to turn the output from
every resource use into the input for another use;
in other words, outputs become inputs.

An example might be the cycle of a glass milk bottle.
The primary input (or resource) is silica-sand, which
is formed into glass and then into a bottle.

The bottle is filled with milk and distributed to the
consumer. At this point, normal waste methods would
see the bottle disposed in a landfill or similar.

But with a zero-waste method, the bottle can be
saddled at the time of sale with a deposit, which
is returned to the bearer upon redemption. The
bottle is then washed, refilled, and resold.

The only material waste is the wash water,
and energy loss has been minimized.




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SECTION 2




ZERO
WASTE
VS
RECYCLING




Difference between
zero waste and recycling!



Despite the similarities, zero waste is not just
another form of recycling; it involves changing
things at the production level.

Take a personal computer: in its constituent parts
(steel, copper, glass, etc.) fairly inexpensive,
yet once built into a computer, worth much more.

However, millions of PCs are disposed of worldwide
each year (160 million in 2007). By adopting a
modular design policy (e.g. each aspect of the
computer is a separate pluggable element) old
computer components can be reused in newer
products.

Zero waste depends on the redesign of industrial,
commercial and consumer goods. Recycling contents
itself with attempts to deal with wastes as
delivered, after goods have become waste.

Zero waste does not accept the unthinking creation
of waste, followed by a scramble to capture
materials.



ZERO WASTE
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_waste



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SECTION 3



ZERO
WASTE
ALLIANCE




The Zero Waste Alliance is a national leader providing
assistance to industry sectors and organizations for
development and implementation of standards, tools and
practices that lead to a more sustainable future through
the reduction and elimination of waste and toxics.



Our Mission:
is to help organizations
implement sustainable
solutions and standards
to realize a more
sustainable future.


We collaborate with
universities, government,
businesses and other
organizations working to
develop, promote and
apply zero waste and
sustainability strategies
for the benefit of current
and future generations.


Our Objective:
is to provide
improved profitability,
competitiveness and
environmental performance
through the development
and implementation of
practices that lead to
the reduction and
elimination of waste
and toxics.


Zero Waste improves
profitability,
competitiveness and
environmental performance.



Zero Waste Alliance
http://www.zerowaste.org/



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SECTION 4



CRADLE
TO
CRADLE




William McDonough's book, written with his colleague,
the German chemist Michael Braungart, is a manifesto
calling for the transformation of human industry
through ecologically intelligent design.

In Cradle to Cradle, McDonough and Braungart argue
that the conflict between industry and the environment
is not an indictment of commerce but an outgrowth of
purely opportunistic design.

The design of products and manufacturing systems
growing out of the Industrial Revolution reflected
the spirit of the day-and yielded a host of
unintended yet tragic consequences.



William McDonough,
Michael Braungart

http://www.mcdonough.com/cradle_to_cradle.htm/



Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
is a 2002 book by German chemist Michael Braungart
and architect William McDonough.

It is a manifesto calling for the transformation
of human industry through ecologically intelligent
design.




Cradle to cradle
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cradle_to_cradle/



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SECTION 4A



CRADLE
TO
CRADLE
LINKS




ALTERNATIVE ENERGY NEWS
http://www.alternative-energy-news.info/

Braungart.com
http://www.braungart.com/

Cradle To Cradle
http://www.cradletocradlehome.com/

Environmental Protection Encouragement Agency (EPEA)
http://www.epea.com/

Inhabitat
http://www.inhabitat.com/

Iobserve
http://iobserve.wordpress.com/cradle-to-cradle/

MBDC
http://www.mbdc.com/

McDonough's architecture and community design firm.
http://www.mcdonoughpartners.com/

MCDONOUGH.COM
http://www.mcdonough.com/

The Next Industrial Revolution
http://www.thenextindustrialrevolution.org/

TED Talks Architect and designer
http://www.ted.com/

Tree Hugger
http://www.treehugger.com/

World Changing
http://www.worldchanging.com/



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SECTION 5



GOOD
ELECTRONIC
PRODUCT
MANAGEMENT




Good electronic product management
has three strategies:



1. Purchase greener
electronic products.


Buy only EPEAT:
(Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool)
registered computers. They will have many advantages
such as more recycled content, lower toxics, lower
energy use, etc.

In addition, the manufacturers will take their
products back at the end of life. The federal
government is required to buy at least 95%
EPEAT registered computers and other
organizations should do so too.



EPEAT
http://www.epeat.net


2. Reduce impacts during use.

Keep the power management settings adjusted for
minimum energy use; turn off when not in use for
hours and use upgrades to extend the product's
lifetime.



3. Manage obsolete electronics
in an environmentally safe way.


Check out the EPA’s Plug-In to eCycling guidelines:

EPA
http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/osw/conserve/plugin/guide.htm


Electronics recyclers nationwide can be found
through the Electronics Recycling Center.


Electronics recyclers
http://www.electronicsrecycling.org/


When you find a recycler, be sure to ask them if they
handle the waste according to the eCycling guidelines.

For a list of recycling companies that have promised
not to export hazardous waste or dispose of it in
landfills, check the website of the Basel Action
Network, a group that advocates green solutions to
e-waste issues:

BASEL ACTION NETWORK
http:///ban.org/pledge1.html


The Oregon legislature passed an electronics
recycling law in 2007, creating a free
statewide collection program.

The Oregon DEQ has contracted with the team
of the National Center for Electronics
Recycling (NCER) and the Zero Waste Alliance
(ZWA) to design, implement, and manage the
program.



Information and collection
locations are here:


Electronics recyclers
http://www.electronicsrecycling.org/


These strategies are part of the Federal Electronic Challenge.

Federal Electronic Challenge
http://www.federalelectronicschallenge.net/overview.htm



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SECTION 6



OBSOLESCENCE




Obsolescence is the state of being which occurs when
a person, object, or service is no longer wanted even
though it may still be in good working order.

Obsolescence frequently occurs because a replacement
has become available that is superior in one or more
aspects.



OBSOLESCENCE
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsolescent


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SECTION 7



PLANNED
OBSOLESCENCE




Planned obsolescence or built-in obsolescence[1] is
the process of a product becoming obsolete and/or
non-functional after a certain period or amount of
use in a way that is planned or designed by the
manufacturer.

Planned obsolescence has potential benefits for a
producer because the product fails and the consumer
is under pressure to purchase again, whether from
the same manufacturer (a replacement part or a
newer model), or from a competitor which might also
rely on planned obsolescence.

The purpose of planned obsolescence is to hide the
real cost per use from the consumer, and charge a
higher price than they would otherwise be willing
to pay (or would be unwilling to spend all at once).

For an industry, planned obsolescence stimulates
demand by encouraging purchasers to buy again sooner
if they still want a functioning product.

Built-in obsolescence is in many different products,
from vehicles to light bulbs, from buildings to
software. There is, however, the potential backlash
of consumers who learn that the manufacturer invested
money to make the product obsolete faster; such
consumers might turn to a producer (if any exists)
that offers a more durable alternative.



PLANNED OBSOLESENCE
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence



PLANNED
OBSOLESCENCE




WHAT
DOES
PLANNED
OBSOLESCENCE
MEAN?



A manufacturing decision by a company to make consumer
products in such a way that they become out-of-date or
useless within a known time period.

The main goal of this type of production is to ensure
that consumers will have to buy the product multiple
times, rather than only once. This naturally stimulates
demand for an industry's products because consumers have
to keep coming back again and again.

Products ranging from inexpensive light bulbs to
high-priced goods such as cars and buildings are
subject to planned obsolescence by manufacturers
and producers.




Also known as
"built-in obsolescence".

Investopedia explains:
Planned Obsolescence



Planned obsolescence does not always sit well with consumers,
especially if competing companies offer similar products but
with much more durability. Pushing this production too far
can result in customer backlash, or a bad reputation for a
brand.

However, planned obsolescence doesn't always have such a
negative connotation. Companies can engage in this activity
solely as a means of controlling costs.

For example, a cell phone manufacturer may decide to use
parts in its phones that have a maximum lifespan of five
years, instead of parts that could last 20 years.

It's unlikely most consumers will use the same cell phone
five years after purchase, and so the company can lower
input costs by using cheaper parts without fearing a
customers backlash.




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SECTION 7A



PLANNED
OBSOLESCENCE
LINKS




AD BUSTERS
http://www.adbusters.org/

Economist
http://www.economist.com/

FAST COMPANY
http://www.fastcompany.com/

Planned Obsolescence
http://www.plannedobsolescence.net/

Planned obsolescence
http://www.greenlivingtips.com/articles/231/1/Planned-obsolescence.html

STAY FREE MAGAZINE
http://www.stayfreemagazine.org/

The story of stuff
http://www.storyofstuff.com

Technology made to be broken
http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0502/p09s02-coop.html



Ethical consumerism
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethical_consumerism

Functional obsolescence
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_obsolescence

Sustainability
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sustainability





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SECTION 8



ZERO
WASTE
LINKS




American Chemical Society Education – Green Chemistry
http://www.acs.org/education/greenchem

Charitable Recycling
http://www.charitablerecycling.com/

EPA Green Chemistry
http://www.epa.gov/greenchemistry

EPA Environmental Management Systems Clearinghouse
http://www.epa.gov/ems/

Eco-Cycle
http://www.ecocycle.org/

Grass Roots Recycling Network (GRRN)
http://www.grrn.org/

Grass Roots Recycling Network (GRRN) Zero Waste Page
http://www.grrn.org/zerowaste

Green Chemistry Network
http://www.chemsoc.org/networks/gcn/

Green Chemistry at the University of Oregon
http://www.uoregon.edu/~hutchlab/greenchem



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How to put on a zero waste event
http://www.keysnet.com/205/story/83287.html

The International Society for Industrial Ecology
http://www.yale.edu/is4ie

Industrial Ecology Resource NPPC
http://www.umich.edu/~nppcpub/resources/ResLists/Ind.Ec.html

International Organization for Standardization (ISO)
http://www.iso.ch/iso/en/ISOOnline.openerpage

Life Cycle Analysis and Assessment
http://www.gdrc.org/uem/waste/life-cycle.html

Metro
http://www.metro-region.org/

Minnesota Office of Environmental Assistance DfE Toolkit
http://www.moea.state.mn.us/berc/dfetoolkit.cfm

Multi-State Working Group on Environmental Management Systems
http://www.mswg.org



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National Database on Environmental Management Systems
http://www.eli.org/isopilots.htm

National Health Information Center
http://www.natural-health-information-centre.com/

NSF Science and Technology Center for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes
http://www.nsfstc.unc.edu

Our Earth.org
http://www.ourearth.org/

Recycling Super Guide
http://www.recyclingsuperguide.com/

Royal Society of Chemistry
http://www.rsc.org/

Saving Civilization.org
http://www.savingcivilization.org/

he-Science-Lab.com
http://www.the-science-lab.com/Environment

Sustainable Products Purchasers Coalition
http://www.sppcoalition.org



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US EPA Design for Environment Program Home
http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/dfe/

Zero Waste Alliance
http://www.zerowaste.org/

Zero Waste America
http://www.zerowasteamerica.org/

Zero Waste Institute
http://ww.zerowasteinstitute.org/

Zero Waste California
http://www.zerowaste.ca.gov/

Zero Waste in the 21st Century
http://www.zerowaste.com

Zero Waste Index
http://www.grrn.org/zerowaste/

Zero Waste International Alliance (ZWIA
http://www.zwia.org/

Zer0-M
http://www.zer0-m.org

Zero Waste Alliance Ireland
http://www.zerowastealliance.ie/

Zero Waste - A New Systems Approach
http://www.ecocycle.org/ZeroWaste/

Zero Waste America
http://www.zerowasteamerica.org

Zero Waste Network
http://www.zerowastenetwork.org/

Zero Waste New Zealand
http://www.zerowaste.co.nz/




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