PICKLE
PICKLES
PICKLING




PICKLE

WHAT IS PICKLING?

HOW TO PICKLE VEGETABLES

PICKLE TYPES

PICKLING LINKS



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SECTION 1



PICKLE




a solution or bath for preserving or cleaning: such as

a brine or vinegar solution in which foods are preserved

an article of food that has been preserved in brine or in vinegar;
specifically : a cucumber that has been so preserved



Pickle
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pickle



Pickle
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickle




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SECTION 2



WHAT IS
PICKLING?




What makes a pickle a pickle? On a most general level, pickles are
foods soaked in solutions that help prevent spoilage.

There are two basic categories of pickles. The first type includes
pickles preserved in vinegar, a strong acid in which few bacteria
can survive. Most of the bottled kosher cucumber pickles available
in the supermarket are preserved in vinegar.

The other category includes pickles soaked in a salt brine to encourages
fermentation—the growth of "good" bacteria that make a food less vulnerable
to "bad" spoilage-causing bacteria. Common examples of fermented pickles
include kimchi and many cucumber dill pickles.



What is Pickling?
https://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/pickles/pickling.html



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SECTION 3



HOW TO PICKLE
VEGETABLES




A great way to use up veggies that are hanging out in the bottom
drawers of your fridge!

The idea of pickling is to create an environment in which vegetables
can be preserved and saved from decaying. This can usually be done
with a combination of salt, acid and fermentation with bacteria. The
benefits of pickling in a traditional way is that lactic acid
fermentation is allowed to happen.

Traditional pickling methods have been an essential part of healthy
human diets for thousands of years. Commercial products can be
questionable about the methods used as to whether they still offer
any nutritional benefits.

Vitamins, minerals and the fiber content of vegetables are still
retained when pickling.


INGREDIENTS

any vegetables you like (we used cucumbers, cauliflower, onion
and radishes)

fresh or dried spices (we used peppercorns, cumin, coriander,
mustard seeds, & caraway)

1 cup any kind of vinegar (I used white wine vinegar)

1 cup filtered water

1 tablespoon kosher or any non-iodized salt

optional: 1 teaspoon sugar



WHAT TO DO

1.Wash and cut up your vegetables and pack them into a clean jar.

2.Add between ¼ - ½ teaspoon of whole dried spices.

3.Combine vinegar, filtered water and salt in a medium saucepan
and bring to a boil.

4.Put your just boiled brine over the vegetables in the jar and
put on the lid.

5.Hide the jar in the back of the fridge for at least a week.
Two weeks is better. Three is best.

6.Keep them in the fridge for up to 6 months.



How To Pickle Vegetables
https://www.foodmatters.com/recipe/how-to-pickle-vegetables



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SECTION 4



PICKLE
TYPES




Of the thousand of types of pickles that converge upon the pantry,
refrigerator and supermarket shelves in New York, all fall into one
of these categories:


1. FERMENTED PICKLES:

The oldest method of pickling, when a naturally occurring bacteria
transforms the sugars present in the ingredient into an acid, preserving
the food. These are called "processed" pickles, and though they take as
many as five weeks to cure, they last up to 2 years. They have a very
sharp flavor, and their texture is somewhat softer than other types.
Fermentation is the controlled decomposition of food. In the case of
fermented pickles, salt controls the pickle's texture, limits unwanted
micro-organisms, and ensures ingredients don't ferment too quickly.
Dry-salted pickles extract water from the vegetable itself to produce
the brine; brined pickles are covered with salt dissolved in water.


2. FRESH PACK/QUICK PROCESS PICKLES:

Fresh Pack includes pasteurization, and it's one of the most common methods
for commercial jarred pickles. Fresh fruit or vegetables are first bottled,
and then heated to at least 160º F, which kills any bacteria. Their
shelf-life is about 18 months.


3. REFRIGERATED PICKLES:

The most common home-pickling process, it requires a combination of refrigeration,
vinegar, or alcohol to kill bacteria that could spoil the pickles. This process,
also known as acidification, has the shortest shelf-life. The acid changes the
texture of the pickle, and, overtime, can turn it mushy. Also called fresh pickles,
they retain their bright coloration, and are particularly crisp, crunchy, and fresh
tasting.



PICKLE TYPES
http://www.nyfoodmuseum.org/_pkwhat.htm



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What are the Different Types of Pickles?
https://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-different-types-of-pickles.htm




What Are the Best Tips for Pickling Peppers?
https://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-best-tips-for-pickling-peppers.htm




What Are the Best Tips for Making Pickled Garlic?
https://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-best-tips-for-making-pickled-garlic.htm




What is Gari?
https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-gari.htm




What is the Difference Between Pickling Cucumbers and Salad Cucumbers?
https://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-the-difference-between-pickling-cucumbers-and-salad-cucumbers.htm




What is Pickled Watermelon Rind?
https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-pickled-watermelon-rind.htm




What are Pickling Spices?
https://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-pickling-spices.htm




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Pickling
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickling




Pickled snakes
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickled_snakes




Brining
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brining




Indian pickle
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_pickle




Mixed pickle
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixed_pickle




Pickled cucumber
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickled_cucumber




Pickled egg
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickled_egg




Pickling salt
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickling_salt




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SECTION 5



PICKLING
LINKS




Different Types of Pickles
http://www.infobarrel.com/Different_Types_of_Pickles

History in a Jar: Story of Pickles
http://www.pbs.org/food/the-history-kitchen/history-pickles/

How Are Pickles Made?
https://wonderopolis.org/wonder/how-are-pickles-made

How to make pickled eggs
http://www.helpwithcooking.com/egg-guide/make-pickled-eggs.html

How to Make the Quickest, Easiest Homemade Pickles
https://www.bonappetit.com/test-kitchen/how-to/article/how-to-pickle

How To Pickle
http://www.howtopickle.com/

How to Pickle Anything at a Moment's Notice
https://food52.com/blog/21663-pickle-on-a-moments-notice-with-this-nifty-trick

How to Pickle Anything (No Canning Necessary)
http://www.eatingwell.com/article/114109/how-to-pickle-anything-no-canning-necessary/

How Pickle Are Made
http://www.madehow.com/Volume-4/Pickle.html

How to Pickle Basically Everything
https://www.epicurious.com/expert-advice/how-to-pickle-basically-everything-article

How To Pickle Just About Anything
https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-to-pickle-anything-home-ha-109125

How To Pickle Vegetables
https://www.tablespoon.com/posts/how-to-pickle-vegetables

How to Pickle Your Harvest
https://bonnieplants.com/library/how-to-pickle-harvest/

How To Quick Pickle Any Vegetable
https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-quick-pickle-any-vegetable-233882

I Love Pickles
https://www.ilovepickles.org/

National Center for Home Food Preservation
http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can6b_pickle.html

Pickle Glossary
http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/condiments/pickles/pickle-glossary.asp

Pickles & Pickling
http://www.foodreference.com/html/artpickles.html

Pickled Watermelon Rind
http://endhunger.org/something-from-nothing/

Pickling chile peppers
http://www.g6csy.net/chile/pickling.html

Pickling 101: A Beginner's Guide
https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/food-recipes/cooking/tips/a23876/pickling-guide/

Science of Pickles
http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/pickles/tips.html



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The Grocer's Encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grocer%27s_Encyclopedia/




What Eats?
http://www.whateats.com/




Fermentation in food processing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermentation_in_food_processing




Portal:Agriculture and Agronomy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Agriculture_and_Agronomy




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