ORGANIC
GARDENING




ORGANIC GARDENING

PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIC GARDENING

ORGANIC GARDENING LINKS



BACK TO TOP



SECTION 1



ORGANIC
GARDENING




According to the Organic Farming
Research Foundation (OFRF),
organic farming management relies
on developing bio-diversity in the
field to interrupt habitat for pests
and to replenish the soil.

In contrast to conventional farming,
organic farming is an agricultural
production method that does not use
pesticides. In order to be efficient
as an organic farmer it is essential
that the farmer engages in strategic
planning to avoid diminishing the soil
fertility.

Soils are enhanced through the use of
composting, cover crops, and increased
diversity of plants and microorganisms.


Organic farming is a form of agriculture
that relies on ecosystem management and
attempts to reduce or eliminate external
agricultural inputs, especially synthetic
ones.

It is a holistic production management
system that promotes and enhances agro-
ecosystem health, including biodiversity,
biological cycles, and soil biological
activity.

In preference to the use of off-farm
inputs, organic farming emphasizes
management practices, taking into
account that regional conditions
require locally adapted systems.

Utilizing both the traditional and
the scientific knowledge, organic
agricultural systems rely on agronomic,
biological, and mechanical methods
(these may require external inputs of
nonrenewable resources, like tractor
fuel), as opposed to using synthetic
materials, to fulfill any specific
function within the system.

Organic farming is also associated with
support for principles beyond cultural
practices, such as the fair trade and
environmental stewardship, although this
does not apply to all organic farms and
farmers.




BACK TO TOP



SECTION 2



THE FOUR
PRINCIPLES
OF
ORGANIC
AGRICULTUE




The Principles of
Organic Agriculture:


The Principles of Organic Agriculture were
established by the International Federation
of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM) in
September, 2005. They embody a global vision
for organic farming.

The The aim of the principles is both to
inspire the organic movement and to describe
the purpose of organic agriculture to the
wider world.

The principles are intended to "apply to
agriculture in the broadest sense, including
the way people tend soils, water, plants and
animals in order to produce, prepare and
distribute goods.

They concern the way people interact with
living landscapes, relate to one another and
shape the legacy of future generations.



The four principles
of organic agriculture:


1. The Principle of Health:

Organic agriculture should sustain
and enhance the health of soil,
plant, animal and human as one and
indivisible.


2. The Principle of Ecology:

Organic agriculture should be based
on living ecological systems and
cycles, work with them, emulate them
and help sustain them.


3. The Principle of Fairness:

Organic agriculture should build on
relationships that ensure fairness
with regard to the common environment
and life opportunities.


4. The Principle of Care:

Organic agriculture should be managed
in a precautionary and responsible
manner to protect the health and well
being of current and future generations
and the environment.


These Principles are the roots from which
organic agriculture grows and develops.
They express the contribution that organic
agriculture can make to the world, and a
vision to improve all agriculture in a
global context.

Agriculture is one of humankind's most
basic activities because all people need
to nourish themselves daily. History,
culture and the community values are
embedded in agriculture.

The Principles apply to agriculture in
the broadest sense, including the way
people tend soils, water, plants and
animals in order to produce, prepare
and distribute food and other goods.

They concern the way people interact
with living landscapes, relate to one
another and shape the legacy of future
generations.

Organic agriculture is a living and
dynamic system that responds to
internal and external demands and
conditions. Practitioners of organic
agriculture can enhance efficiency
and increase productivity, but this
should not be at the risk of
jeopardizing health and well-being.

Consequently, new technologies need to
be assessed and existing methods reviewed.
Given the incomplete understanding of
ecosystems and agriculture, care must be
taken.




BACK TO TOP



SECTION 3



ORGANIC
GARDENING
LINKS




AVANT-GARDENING
http://www.avant-gardening.com/

BACKYARD NATURE
http://www.backyardnature.net/

ECOLOGY CENTER
http://www.ecologycenter.org/

FARMER ALMANAC
http://www.farmersalmanac.com/

FARMER ALMANAC TV
http://www.farmersalmanactv.com/

THE GARDEN'S NETWORK
http://www.gardenersnet.com/

GARDEN ORGANIC
http://www.gardenorganic.org.uk/

GLOBAL INVASIVE
SPECIES DATABASE

http://www.invasivespecies.net/

GOING ORGANIC
http://www.goingorganic.com/

THE GREEN WEB
http://www.boldweb.com/

INVASIVE SPECIES
SPECIALIST GROUP(ISSG)

http://www.issg.org/

ORGANIC DOWN UNDER
http://www.organicdownunder.com/

ORGANIC GARDENING.COM
http://www.organicgardening.com/

ORGANIC GARDENING.NET
http://www.organic-gardening.net/

ORGANIC GARDENING TIPS
http://www.organicgardentips.com/



BACK TO TOP



CODEX


GREEN INDEX


GREEN SUB-INDEX


HOME


E-MAIL