MENTORS
MENTORING
MENTORSHIP




MENTOR

MENTORSHIP

STARTING A MENTORING PROGRAM

HOW TO DEVELOP A MENTORING PLAN

GRANTS FOR YOUTH MENTORING PROGRAMS

GRANTS FOR YOUTH MENTORING PROGRAMS RELATED TOPICS

MENTOR LINKS


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SECTION 1



MENTOR




Some professions have "mentoring programs" in which newcomers
are paired with more experienced people in order to obtain good
examples and advice as they advance, and schools sometimes have
mentoring programs for new students or students who are having
difficulties.

Today mentors provide their expertise to less experienced individuals
in order to help them advance their careers, enhance their education,
and build their networks.



Mentor
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentor/



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SECTION 2



MENTORSHIP




Mentorship refers to a developmental relationship between a more
experienced mentor and a less experienced partner referred to as
a mentee or protégé. A person guided and protected by a more
prominent person.




Mentoring
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentoring/



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SECTION 3




STARTING
A
MENTORING
PROGRAM




Developing a mentoring program is a great way to get involved and
make a valuable contribution in your community. Taking time to plan
carefully before the program begins can eliminate a lot of barriers
during the implementation process.


1. Assess the needs and resources available in the community and
see if there are existing programs with a similar mission or with
which you might be able to collaborate. Learn more about community
assessments and view other youth serving programs in your area.


2. Design the parameters of the program. • Define the youth population
that will be served.

Consider age, gender, mentoring need, and common characteristics.


Identify who you will recruit as mentors.

Determine the type of mentoring relationships (e.g., who will be served,
and how they will be served?).

Determine the focus of the mentoring relationships.

Academic

School to career

Positive youth development


Determine where the mentoring sessions will occur.

Determine how often mentors and mentees will meet and the desired
length of the mentoring matches.

Determine desired outcomes.

Determine if the program will stand alone or collaborate with
other programs.

Identify key stakeholders and generate buy-in.

Plan how the program will be evaluated.

Develop policies and procedures to support the program.

Establish a case management protocol to ensure communication with
mentors and mentees.


3. Plan how the program will be managed (e.g., organizational structure).

Identify a management team.

Ensure clear roles.

Establish policies and procedures.

Implement ongoing training.

Develop a financial plan (e.g., securing funding streams, establishing
internal controls).


4. Implement the program.


5. Continuously evaluate the program and adjust as needed.

One way to get additional assistance in both the planning and implementation
stages is to reach out to a national mentoring organization or collaborate
with other community organizations, schools, businesses, and programs in order
to access resources and learn from the experiences of others.



Starting a Mentoring Program
http://www.findyouthinfo.gov/youth-topics/mentoring/considerations-starting-mentoring-program



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SECTION 4




HOW TO
DEVELOP
A
MENTORING
PLAN




Mentoring is used in schools, churches, and staff development programs.
There is no single mentoring plan that fits everyone. Some are formal,
official programs within an organization, while others are more casual
and informal relationships that you create for yourself.

Whether you are designing a mentoring program for others or are interested
in finding your own mentor, learning how to develop a mentoring plan will
help you get started.



Steps


1. Identify the purpose of your
mentoring relationship.


You may want to teach specific information or develop a particular skill.
Having a clear purpose in mind will help you develop a specific mentoring
plan that meets your needs and expectations.

Academic mentoring relationships help students learn skills for studying,
writing, and math that will help them succeed in the classroom.

Personal development mentoring focuses on growing in social or leadership
skills, or in developing one's character.

Workplace mentoring often partners new employees with current ones in order
to help them learn specific tasks or jobs.

They may also be training opportunities designed to help an employee earn a
promotion or transition into a different job.



2. Determine the format of mentoring
you would like to put in place.


Each person prefers a certain environment in which they can connect with
their mentor. Decide what works best for you.

Traditional mentoring consists of a one-on-one, face-to-face relationship.

Group mentoring includes one mentor but several mentees.

Team mentoring involves several mentors with several mentees.

Peer mentoring consists of a more mutual relationship, where each person mentors
the other.

E-mentoring tends to be one-on-one, but takes place via email and the Internet.
However, the individuals involved in e-mentoring often start their relationship
with a face-to-face meeting.



3. Identify potential mentors.

Mentors should be knowledgeable in the area you want to learn about. You should
also have a good connection with them. If you cannot think of anyone, ask a
friend or supervisor for suggestions.



4. Ask someone to mentor you.

It is important that you are clear and upfront about your initial expectations
for this mentoring relationship so the potential mentor can decide if they are
a good fit. If the person declines, do not take it to heart. Simply ask someone
else.

If you are pairing others together in mentoring relationships, it is important
that you consider your matches carefully. Take interests, personalities, and
skills into consideration.



5. Brainstorm potential activities or discussions.

You have a particular purpose for this mentoring relationship. Explore different
things you may learn throughout it. •Make a list of specific things you want to
learn. For example, if the purpose for mentoring is to learn more about classic
literature, identify authors like Shakespeare and Milton in whose work you have
a particular interest in learning.

Write a tentative agenda for mentoring sessions. Do this with your mentor. Allow
them to add things to the list. For example, they may want to introduce you to a
classic author you have never read.



6. Create a structure for your mentoring relationship.

This helps both mentors and mentees have appropriate expectations and enables them
to decide if the commitment is one they can realistically manage.

Determine when and how often you will meet. Figure out which days and times work
best for you. Then, based on your goals for this mentoring relationship, decide
how often you will need to meet with your mentor.

Decide where you will meet. Some mentors prefer to have their mentee tag along
with them during daily routines. Others may want to meet in a more casual setting
such as a coffee shop, a restaurant, or the park.

Lay down relationship guidelines. Together, decide when it is appropriate to call
each other, what information will be kept confidential, if it is okay to visit one
another at home, and so forth.

Set a tentative time frame for your mentoring relationship. Mentoring often takes
place for 6 months to 1 year. At the end of that time, revisit your purpose for
meeting and decide if you want to renew your commitment for another set period of
time.



7. Commit to the mentoring relationship.

Trust and reliability are two factors that are essential in strengthening the
mentoring relationship. Each person needs to agree to show up regularly and on
time.

They also need to fulfill any personal obligations they agreed to throughout the
mentoring. For example, if you are reading through a book together, each person
needs to finish the reading for each session.



Tips


Use people from the past as mentors. Though you cannot meet with them face-to-face,
you can read their memoirs, journals, or a biography. Historical figures may be able
to teach us lessons others in our current society may not.

Communicate why and how mentoring is effective if you are creating a mentoring program
for an organization. Explain to potential mentors and mentees how mentoring can help
someone learn specific skills, build relationships, and be a valuable resource for them.

Discuss finances up front. If you are meeting at a coffee shop or reading through a book
together, there are going to be expenses involved. Decide who will pay for what.


Warnings

Be careful in mentoring relationships where mentors and mentees are opposite genders.

Create appropriate boundaries and expectations that you and your families are comfortable with.



How to Develop a Mentoring Plan
http://www.wikihow.com/Develop-a-Mentoring-Plan



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SECTION 5




GRANTS
FOR
YOUTH
MENTORING
PROGRAMS




Youth mentoring programs are a way for adults to teach kids skills
they might not learn at home, such as coping with anger, avoiding
violence and abstaining from drugs, in a safe, healthy environment.

Unfortunately, budget cuts affecting small, non-profit organizations
and schools could leave thousands of children without the support
they need to become fully functioning adults. Having the funds to
support or start programs like these is just as important as finding
volunteers to staff them.



U.S. Department of Education Mentoring Grant

Established as part of the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act, the U.S.
Department of Education mentoring grants are available to three types
of agencies: community-based organizations (CBO) that are not-for-profit,
local education agencies (LEA), or a collaboration between the two.

Awards are available in varying amounts based on the need outlined in
the agency's or organization's grant proposal. To learn about current
opportunities for grants and grant deadlines, contact the U.S.
Department of Education.



U.S. Department of Education, OSDFS

550 12th Street, S.W., Rm. 10120, PCP

Washington, DC 20202-6450

202-245-7883


U.S. Department of Education Mentoring Grant
http://www.ed.gov/fund/grants-apply.html


Stepping Stones

Sponsored by The Mentor Network, the Stepping Stones fund is
for programs that mentor children deemed at-risk, children
transitioning in or out of foster care, or children in other
circumstances without financial and emotional support.

Organizations that may apply for this grant include tax-exempt
organizations, research groups and occasionally young individuals.
Applications are accepted throughout the fiscal year (beginning in
October), and recipients are announced quarterly in January, April,
July and October. Contact your local office by locating it on The
Mentor Network's website.



The Mentor Network's website
http://www.thementornetwork.com/


Mentoring Children of Prisoners Program

As its title suggests, the Mentoring Children of Prisoners Program
grant can only be used by programs that are serve this specific
subset or plan on doing so. An organizations may qualify for this
grant if it agrees to find mentors who will donate at least one
hour of their time per week, screen possible mentors for negative
histories that might affect working with children, provide training
for the mentors and monitor and evaluate the mentors throughout
their volunteer commitment.

Given by the Family and Youth Services Bureau, a part of the
Administration for Children and Families under the U.S. Department
of Health and Human Services, this grant is given depending on
whether there are available funds to support it. Interested parties
must fill out an application through the only government-approved
grant proposal website.



National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth

P.O. Box 13505

Silver Spring, MD 20911-3505

301-608-8098


National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth
http://www.ncfy.acf.hhs.gov


Grants for Youth Mentoring Programs
http://www.ehow.com/list_6711606_grants-youth-mentoring-programs.html



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SECTION 6




GRANTS
FOR
YOUTH
MENTORING
PROGRAMS
RELATED
TOPICS




Youth Organizations
http://www.ehow.com/cultures/charities-organizations/youth-organizations/

Examples of Grant Proposals for Youth Centers
http://www.ehow.com/list_6805167_examples-grant-proposals-youth-centers.html

How to Receive a Grant for a Mentoring Program
http://www.ehow.com/how_7838941_receive-grant-mentoring-program.html

How to Launch a Mentoring Program
http://www.ehow.com/how_10075374_launch-mentoring-program.html

The Importance of Mentoring Kids
http://www.ehow.com/info_12310657_importance-mentoring-kids.html

Job Description for a Youth Mentor
http://www.ehow.com/about_6605109_job-description-youth-mentor.html

Youth Mentoring Grants
http://www.ehow.com/list_6038800_youth-mentoring-grants.html

How to Receive a Grant for a Mentoring Program
http://www.ehow.com/how_7838941_receive-grant-mentoring-program.html

Youth Program Grants
http://www.ehow.com/list_6016574_youth-program-grants.html

Examples of Grant Proposals for Youth Centers
http://www.ehow.com/list_6805167_examples-grant-proposals-youth-centers.html

How to Apply For Government Grants The Easy Way
http://www.ehow.com/how_5153167_apply-government-grants-easy-way.html

Grants for Ex-Offenders
http://www.ehow.com/list_6616029_grants-ex_offenders.html

Federal Government Grants for Non Profit Day Care
http://www.ehow.com/list_6741042_federal-non-profit-day-care.html

Federal Grants for Youth Programs
http://www.ehow.com/info_7984257_federal-grants-youth-programs.html



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SECTION 7



MENTORS
MENTORING
MENTORSHIP
LINKS




Best Practices for Mentoring
http://www.opm.gov/hrd/lead/BestPractices-Mentoring.pdf

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America
http://www.bbbsa.org/

Boys to Men
http://boystomen.org/

The DREAM Program
http://www.dreamprogram.org/

The effects of a mentoring program on at-risk youth
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/metro4h/sites/default/files/the_effects_of_a_mentoring_program_on_at-risk_youth__adolescence__find_articles_at_bnet.pdf

A Guide for Establishing Mentoring Programs to Prepare Youth for College
http://www2.ed.gov/PDFDocs/yyc.pdf

How to Build a Mentoring Program
http://www.opm.gov/Wiki/uploads/docs/Wiki/OPM/training/Mentoring%20Toolkit%203-18-10.pdf

How to Establish a Mentor Program
http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/stories/2008-02-06/how-to-establish-a-mentor-programbusinessweek-business-news-stock-market-and-financial-advice

How to Start a Mentoring Program
http://www.inc.com/guides/2010/04/start-mentoring-program.html

How to Start a Mentoring Program
http://www.diversityinc.com/diversity-management/how-to-start-a-mentoring-program/

How to Start a Mentorship Program
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/how-to-start-a-mentorship-program/

How to start and run a mentoring program
http://www.journalofaccountancy.com/Issues/2014/Mar/20138640.htm

How to start a youth mentoring program
http://health.wikinut.com/How-to-start-a-youth-mentoring-program/wkjbm6u1/

Information For Starting A Girls Mentoring Program or Girls Club
http://afropuffsandponytails.com/empowerment-of-african-american-young-girls-and-teen-girls/information-for-starting-a-girls-mentoring-program-or-girls-club/

International Mentoring Network Organization
http://www.imno.org/

Kinship Mentoring Network
http://www.kinshipinc.org/

Mentor
http://www.mentoring.org/

Mentoring
http://www.mentoring.org/downloads/mentoring_415.pdf

Mentoring
http://www.ppv.org/ppv/publications/assets/153_publication.pdf

Mentoring
http://www.100blackmen.org/mentoring.aspx

Mentoring Children of Prisoners Program
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/fysb/content/youthdivision/programs/mcpfactsheet.htm

MENTOR/National Mentoring Partnership
http://www.mentoring.org/

Start Mentoring Program
http://www.inc.com/guides/2010/04/start-mentoring-program.html

Start Mentoring Program
http://www.emt.org/userfiles/StartMentWeb.pdf

What Does Mentoring Cost?
http://www.beamentor.org/TaxDeductible_3.htm

What Does It Take To Start a Mentoring Program?
http://www.ncjrs.gov/html/youthbulletin/9907-4/mentor-3.html

Womens Business Empowerment Network
http://www.woben.co.uk/



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