MINORITY
ETHNIC
GRASSROOTS




THE BLACK URBANIST

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

MINORITY ETHNIC GRASSROOTS LINKS



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SECTION 1



THE
BLACK
URBANIST




Urban design,

urban planning,

community development,

smart growth,

sustainable communities,

housing, transit

and more from the perspective
of a young black woman.




Five Ways You Can Be a Grassroots Planner



I know many of my readers are like myself.

They canít draw buildings or maps. However, they
may have the time and money to go out and organize
the community.

The passion for the city is still there,
but in a different way. So how can these
people contribute to urban planning?



Here are five ways:


1. Run for office

I know in Greensboro, 75% of the issues that come
before council are related to property and zoning
issues. If you donít have the stomach for a
campaign, try to get appointed to the zoning
commission or the board of adjustments.

You can also do like I am doing and volunteer your
services for someone with this gift.



2. Join your neighborhood association.

Iíve discussedthe need for neighborhoods to have a
neighborhood driven, low-fee group to air community
concerns and provide community entertainment. If
your neighborhood association is too structured
(managed by an outside group that has no clue what
the real needs of the neighborhood are), or
non-existent, see how you can get one going.



3. Join me in the blogosphere.

If you are readingthis and thinking about sharing
your ideas on urban planning, go ahead. The more
citizen voices that exist, then more decision-makers
can understand the true reach of the market for
certain activities and living areas.



4. Start a business in an underused area.

Iíd prefer that it would be a green business, but any
business that treats employees fairly or adds life to
an inner city area that appears to be lifeless is good.

Encourage your employees and supporters to give back
to the community as well.



5. Read the Tactical Urbanism guide
and get a project started


There are so many great projects in this book.

Tactical Urbanism guide
http://www.ctdatahaven.org/know/images/8/86/Tactical_Urbanism_Guide_2011_sml.pdf'])

Although these are mostly temporary projects, some
that have become permanent. Also, you donít need
a license or talent just a will to see the project
through and a few friends who do have the talent or
license. The idea is that urbanism is not just for
those with large, sweeping multi-block or acre city
plans, but plans that are smaller and cheaper and
still transform and create great places.


However, because we are talking about grassroots
strategies, there are plenty more ways one can
get involved. Share with me your ways of getting
involved in planning and urban development,
besides drawing the plans themselves.



The Black Urbanist
http://www.theblackurbanist.com/



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SECTION 2



ENVIRONMENTAL
JUSTICE




Environmental justice (EJ) is "the fair treatment
and meaningful involvement of all people regardless
of race, color, sex, national origin, or income with
respect to the development, implementation and
enforcement of environmental laws, regulations,
and policies."

In the words of Bunyan Bryant, "Environmental justice
is served when people can realize their highest
potential."

Environmental justice emerged as a concept in the
United States in the early 1980s; its proponents
generally view the environment as encompassing
"where we live, work, and play" (sometimes "pray"
and "learn" are also included) and seek to redress
inequitable distributions of environmental burdens
(pollution, industrial facilities, crime, etc.).

Root causes of environmental injustices include
"institutionalized racism; the co-modification of



land,

water,

energy and air;

unresponsive, unaccountable
government policies and
regulation;

and lack of resources
and power in affected
communities."



some minorities have viewed the environmental
movement as elitist. Environmental elitism
manifested itself in three different forms:


1.Compositional

Environmentalists are from the middle and upper class.


2.Ideological

The reforms benefit the movementís supporters but
impose costs on nonparticipants.



3.Impact

The reforms have ďregressive social impacts.Ē
They disproportionately benefit environmentalists
and harm underrepresented populations.



Environmental justice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_justice



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SECTION 3



MINORITY
ETHNIC
GRASSROOTS
LINKS




Black Agenda Report
http://www.blackagendareport.com/

The Black Commentator
http://www.blackcommentator.com/

The Black Urbanist
http://www.theblackurbanist.com/

Grass Roots America
http://www.grassrootsamerica.com

Grassroots America WE THE PEOPLE
http://www.gawtp.com/

Grassroots International
http://www.grassrootsonline.org /

Grassroots Leadership Training for Civic Engagement
http://www.wera-nc.org/glt.htm

THE GRASSROOTS STEERING FOUNDATION, INC.
http://www.steeringfoundation.org/

Grassroots Youth Collaborative
http://www.grassrootsyouth.ca/



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The Health Impact Of Hazardous Waste Sites On Minority
http://www.questia.com/googleScholar.qst?docId=5002192383

Human Ecology
http://www.verenenicolas.org/humanecology.html

Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services (iSMSS)
http://www.ismss.ualberta.ca/

Minority Rights Group International
http://www.minorityrights.org/

Minority voices newsroom
http://www.minorityvoices.org /

Preachers of Salvation and Grassroots
http://www.raceandhistory.com/historicalviews/preachers.htm

Tactical Urbanism guide
http://www.ctdatahaven.org/know/images/8/86/Tactical_Urbanism_Guide_2011_sml.pdf'])



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