LIVING
WALLS
VERTICAL
GARDENS




LIVING WALLS

ACTIVE WALLS

INACTIVE WALLS

HOW TO MAKE

BIOFILTRATION

BIOFILTRATION LINKS

ROOF GARDEN

LIVING WALLS LINKS



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SECTION 1



LIVING
WALLS




A living wall is a vertical garden. Plants are
rooted into a substrate varying in effectiveness
from a thin sheet of felt or wool to a thick,
rigid block or coco fibre growing medium.


Second-order walls contain
only plants and some insects,

third-order walls house fish,
salamanders in a pool at the
bottom of the wall, where the
trickling water is captured
before being filtered and
circulated to the top again.




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SECTION 2



ACTIVE
WALLS




'Active walls' are a relatively new,
experimental concept where the plant
materials are joined to a building's
air circulation system.

Fans draw air through the wall and then
circulate the air throughout the building.
Drawing the air through the wall places
the air in the root zone where the
pollutants are broken down by beneficial
microbes.

A variation of this are active walls that
are kept behind glass to create more
predictable airflow effects than inactive
walls.




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SECTION 3



INACTIVE
WALLS




'Inactive walls' have no mechanized air
circulation. Instead, they are kept open
to promote as much free air circulation
as possible.



Living wall
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Living_wall



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SECTION 4



HOW
TO
MAKE
A
LIVING
WALL




A living wall is a vertical arrangement of
plants and other organisms that naturally
removes toxins and unhealthy contaminants
from the air that we breathe.

Living walls can be complete ecosystems or
simpler configurations of plants that thrive
in and help to decontaminate urban environments.
Many living walls are indoors, but they can also
be outdoors, such as on the exterior walls of
buildings.




STEPS




Decide if the living wall is to be set
up indoors or out.

Choose the appropriate plants and other
organisms.

Build a structure for the living wall.

Set up an air re-circulating system.

Arrange the lighting for the plants.

Situate the plants in the living wall.

Water and fertilize the plants.




TIPS




Start a simple living wall first with a
variety of potted plants, and determine
which plants thrive best in the chosen
environment.

Then build a more complicated living wall
using the pants that have thrived well in
the environment.

If making a living wall in an office
environment, have each employee bring
a plant.



Make-a-Living-Wall
http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Living-Wall



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SECTION 5



BIOFILTRATION




Biofiltration is a pollution control
technique using living material to
capture and biologically degrade process
pollutants.

Common uses include processing waste water,
capturing harmful chemicals or silt from
surface runoff, and microbiotic oxidation
of contaminants in air.




EXAMPLES
OF
BIOFILTRATION




Examples of
biofiltration
include;

Bioswales,
Biostrips,
Biobags,
Bioscrubbers,
and Trickling filters

Constructed wetlands
and Natural wetlands

Slow sand filters

Treatment ponds

Green belts

Living walls

Riparian zones,
Riparian forests,
Bosques.



Biofiltration
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biofiltration



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SECTION 5A



BIOFILTRATION
LINKS




Bioswales and strips for storm runoff
http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/env/stormwater/ongoing/pilot_studies/bmps/details/bs_strips/

Description of VOC reduction using biofiltration
http://www-rcf.usc.edu/~bfilter/biofil.html

Odor Control
http://www.thermalprocess.com/Biofilter/biofilter.html

odour links
http://environmentalodour.blogspot.com

Software for Soakaway and SUDS systems design
http://www.webcomsystems.co.uk/

What is a Biofilter
http://www.rain-barrel.net/biofilter.html



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SECTION 6



ROOF
GARDENS




A roof garden
is any garden
on the roof of
a building.


Humans have grown plants atop structures
since antiquity. Besides the decorative
benefit,



roof plantings may
provide food,

temperature control,

architectural enhancement,

recreational opportunities.



Available gardening areas in cities are
often seriously lacking, which is likely
the key impetus for many roof gardens.

The garden may be on the roof of an autonomous
building which takes care of its own water and
waste.

Hydroponics and other alternative methods can
expand the possibilities of roof top gardening
by reducing, for example, the need for soil or
its tremendous weight.

Plantings in containers are used extensively in
roof top gardens. One high-profile example of a
building with a roof garden is Chicago City Hall.



Roof garden
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roof_garden



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SECTION 7



LIVING
WALLS
VERTICAL
GARDENS
ROOFS
GARDENS
LINKS




ARCHITECTS JOURNAL
http://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/

Elevated Landscape Technologies - ELT
http://www.elteasygreen.com/

GATEWAY GREEN
http://www.gatewaygreen.ca/

Greenhouse in the Sky
http://www.ljconline.nl/garden/indexgarden.htm

GREEN ROOFS
http://www.greenroofs.com/

GROOVY GREEN
http://www.groovygreen.com/

THE GROW SPOT
http://www.thegrowspot.com/

Inhabitat
http://www.inhabitat.com/

Ping Mag
http://www.pingmag.jp/

RAIN-BARREL
http://www.rain-barrel.net/

Ralph Hancock website
http://www.ralphhancock.com/

Sierra Green Building Association
http://www.sigba.org/

Sky Gardens
http://www.sky-garden.co.uk/

TREE HUGGER
http://www.treehugger.com/

Urban Agriculture Online
http://www.urbanag.org.au/

VERTICAL GARDEN by PATRICK BLANC
http://www.verticalgardenpatrickblanc.com/

World Changing
http://www.worldchanging.com/



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