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HOME

HOMELESSNESS

HOMELESSNESS IN THE U.S.

HOMELESSNESS WOMEN IN THE U.S.

VAGRANT (PEOPLE)

WHAT IS 211?

HELP FOR HOMELESS WOMEN WITH CHILDREN

HOW TO HOMELESS RELATED TOPICS

HOMELESSNESS LINKS



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SECTION 1



HOME




A home is a dwelling-place used as a permanent or semi-permanent
residence for an individual, family, household or several families
in a tribe. It is often a house, apartment, or other building, or
alternatively a mobile home, houseboat, yurt or any other portable
shelter. Larger groups may live in a nursing home, children's home,
convent or any similar institution.

A homestead also includes agricultural land and facilities for
domesticated animals. Where more secure dwellings are not available,
people may live in the informal and sometimes illegal shacks found
in slums and shanty towns. More generally, "home" may be considered
to be a geographic area, such as a town, village, suburb, city, or
country.



Home
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home



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SECTION 2



HOMELESSNESS




Homelessness describes the condition of people without a regular
dwelling. People who are homeless are most often unable to acquire
and maintain regular, safe, secure, and adequate housing, or lack
"fixed, regular, and adequate night-time residence." The legal
definition of "homeless" varies from country to country, or among
different entities or institutions in the same country or region.

The term homeless may also include people whose primary night-time
residence is in a homeless shelter, a warming center, a domestic
violence shelter, cardboard boxes or other ad hoc housing situation.
American Government homeless enumeration studies also include persons
who sleep in a public or private place not designed for use as a
regular sleeping accommodation for human beings.

An estimated 100 million people worldwide were homeless in 2005. In
western countries the large majority of homeless are men (75-80%),
with single males particularly overrepresented. In America, LGBT
people are over-represented among homeless youth, at 40%.



Homelessness
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homelessness



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SECTION 3



HOMELESSNESS
IN
THE
U.S.




Homelessness in the United States is an area of concern for social
service providers, government officials, policy professionals, and
humanity. The number of homeless people grew in the 1980s, as
housing and social service cuts increased and the economy deteriorated.
The United States government determined that somewhere between 200,000
and 500,000 Americans were then homeless. There are some U.S. federal
programs that could be said to help to end and prevent homelessness,
although there are no homeless-related programs in the Office of
Management and Budget.

While there is no one agreed upon definition, one definition originally
developed as part of the McKinney-Vento Act of 1987 federal legislation,
describes a "homeless" person as being:

1. An individual who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence;

2. An individual who has a primary nighttime residence that is-- A supervised
publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living
accommodations (including welfare hotels, congregate shelters, and transitional
housing for the mentally ill);

An institution that provides a temporary residence for individuals intended to
be institutionalized; or

A public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular
sleeping accommodation for human beings.



Causes


The major causes of homelessness include:

The deinstitutionalization movement from the 1950s onwards in state mental
health systems, to shift towards 'community-based' treatment of the mentally
ill, as opposed to long-term commitment in institutions.

Redevelopment and gentrification activities instituted by cities across the
country through which low-income neighborhoods are declared blighted and
demolished to make way for projects that generate higher property taxes and
other revenue, creating a shortage of housing affordable to low-income working
families, the elderly poor, and the disabled.

The failure of urban housing projects to provide safe, secure, and affordable
housing to the poor.

The economic crises and "stagflation" of the 1970s, which caused high unemployment.
Unlike European countries, US unemployment insurance does not allow unemployed
insurance recipients to obtain job training/education while receiving benefits
except under very limited situations.

The failure of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to provide effective
mental health care and meaningful job training for many homeless veterans,
particularly those of the Vietnam War.

Deprived of normal childhoods, nearly half of foster children in the United
States become homeless when they are released from foster care at age 18.

Natural disasters that destroy homes: hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, etc.
Places of employment are often destroyed too, causing unemployment and
transience.

People who have served time in prison, have abused drugs and alcohol, or have
a history of mental illness find it difficult to impossible to find employment
for years at a time because of the use of computer background checks by
potential employers.

According to the Institution of Housing in 2005, the U.S. Government has focused
42% more on foreign countries rather than homeless Americans, including homeless
veterans.

People who are hiding in order to evade law enforcement.

Women and children who flee domestic violence.

Teenagers who flee or are thrown out by parents who disapprove of their child's
sexual orientation. A 2010 study by the Center for American Progress shows that
a disproportionately high number of homeless youth (between 20-40%) identify as
LGBTQ.

Overly complex building code that makes it difficult for most people to build.
Traditional huts, cars, and tents are illegal, classified as substandard and
may be removed by government, even though the occupant may own the land. Land
owner cannot live on the land cheaply, and so sells the land and becomes homeless.

Foreclosures of homes

Evictions from apartments



Homelessness in the United States
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homelessness_in_the_United_States



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SECTION 4



HOMELESS
WOMEN
IN THE
U.S.




The fastest-growing group of homeless people in the United States
is composed of single women with two or three children. Before the
1980s the homeless population was mostly composed of men.

Within the last two decades, US society[who?] has begun to acknowledge
the growing numbers of homeless women and children. Homeless women are
rarely seen because they often find shelter with relatives, friends,
or other homeless women.[citation needed] The majority of homeless women
are on the streets because of divorce or escaping domestic abuse.
Abandonment is also a key contributor to homelessness in women.

After the Great Depression, divorce rates dropped but abandonment rates
rose suggesting that couples simply split rather than pursue a costly
divorce. Decline of the welfare state, and lack of affordable housing
have also led to the increase of homelessness in women.



Homeless women in the United States
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homelessness_in_women



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SECTION 5



VAGRANT
PEOPLE




A vagrant or a vagabond is a person, often in poverty, who wanders
from place to place without a home or regular employment or income.
Other synonyms include "tramp," "hobo," and "drifter". A vagrant
could be described as being "a person without a settled home or
regular work who wanders from place to place and lives by begging";
vagrancy is the condition of such persons.



Vagrancy (people)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vagrancy_(people)



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SECTION 6



WHAT
IS
211?




Every hour of every day, hundreds of people need essential human
services in the United States, but most do not know where to turn
for assistance. 2-1-1 allows people to begin to get connected and
get answers to their problems.

2-1-1 is an easy to remember telephone number that connects people
with important community services and volunteer opportunities.
2-1-1 is available in 78% of the United States. Both the United Way
of America (UWA) and the Alliance for Information and Referral Systems
(AIRS) are strongly supporting the federal legistlation that will
ensure adequate funding so that every American has access to 2-1-1 in
the United States.



United Way
http://www.unitedway.org/content/splash

Alliance of Information and Referral Systems
http://www.airs.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=1


What is 211?
http://211tbc.blogspot.com/2009/03/what-is-211.html



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SECTION 7



HELP
FOR
HOMELESS
WOMEN
WITH
CHILDREN







The "hidden homeless" is a coined phrase referring to homeless
women and children in the United States. Overcrowded shelters
are turning away women and children, forcing them to take refuge
any place out of the weather. The safety of women and children
on the streets is severely compromised. Fortunately, help is
available.



211


There are constantly people in need of assistance from human
services organizations in the United States. 211 is a toll-free
phone service that helps women and children get the answers and
services they need to survive. 211 connects people with community
services in their area. The problem is that only 78 percent of
United States communities are involved with 211. The best way for
women to find a shelter is still to call 211. 211 is free and
confidential. It is also a referral service, meaning if assistance
isn't available in your area you'll be referred to an area that can
help you.



House of Hope

The House of Hope is a Christian-based organization providing transitional
housing to women and children. First priority goes to mothers ranging from
18 to 25 and children from infancy to eight years old. The program requires
an application process proving the family lives well below the poverty line.
The House of Hope realizes that homeless women and children need special
consideration and help as need demands.



Women in Need (WIN)

Women in Need (WIN) was established in 1983 to meet the needs of homeless
women and children in New York City. The need has not decreased; in fact,
it has increased. WIN provides families headed by women with the opportunity
to have safe, clean housing. Women get the chance to regain their independence,
with assistance from support services and skill-based training provided by the
organization and social service agencies in the city. WIN is a supportive
service to help women break the cycle of homelessness.



Women Veterans

Women veterans are not exempt from the homelessness plight in the United States.
Female vets have different resources available to them from other women. The
military has agencies and programs designed specifically for homeless female
veterans. The Department of Veterans Affairs provides information and support
in obtaining VA benefits and medical services including readjustment counseling.
The Veterans Benefit Administration helps women gain the support of assistance
programs from community-based organizations not sponsored by the VA.



Help for Homeless Women With Children
http://www.ehow.com/info_8142118_homeless-women-children.html#ixzz2J6RukrEA



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SECTION 8



HOMELESSNESS
HOW TO
RELATED
TOPICS




Services for Homeless Women With Children
http://www.ehow.com/info_8668354_services-homeless-women-children.html

How to Help Homeless Veterans
http://www.ehow.com/how_2189723_help-homeless-veterans.html

Services for Homeless Women With Children
http://www.ehow.com/info_8668354_services-homeless-women-children.html

How to Help Homeless Veterans
http://www.ehow.com/how_2189723_help-homeless-veterans.html

How to Get Grants And Help For Homeless Children And Families
http://www.ehow.com/how_5493003_grants-_and-homeless-children-families.html

Grants for Homeless Women
http://www.ehow.com/info_8005799_grants-homeless-women.html

Services for Homeless Women With Children
http://www.ehow.com/info_8668354_services-homeless-women-children.html

What Are the Causes of Homelessness in Women & Children?
http://www.ehow.com/list_7494186_causes-homelessness-women-children.html

How to Survive Being Homeless With Children
http://www.ehow.com/how_2176614_survive-being-homeless-children.html

Gifts for Homeless Women
http://www.ehow.com/list_7421014_gifts-homeless-women.html

How to Minister to Women in Homeless Shelters
http://www.ehow.com/how_8513278_minister-women-homeless-shelters.html

How to Help Homeless Children
http://www.ehow.com/how_2060782_help-homeless-children.html

Organizations That Help Homeless Kids
http://www.ehow.com/info_7904774_organizations-homeless-kids.html

How to Help Children in Homeless Shelters
http://www.ehow.com/how_8178591_children-homeless-shelters.html

Grants for Homeless Shelters for Women
http://www.ehow.com/list_5942157_grants-homeless-shelters-women.html

Homeless Shelters for Families
http://www.ehow.com/info_8075122_homeless-shelters-families.html

What Are the Causes of Homeless Children?
http://www.ehow.com/info_8254143_causes-homeless-children.html



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SECTION 9



HOME
HOMELESS
HOMELESSNESS
LINKS




American Bar Association Commission on Homelessness and Poverty
http://www.abanet.org/homeless/home.html

Are You Ready to Buy A House?
http://www.investopedia.com/articles/mortgages-real-estate/10/ready-to-buy-house.asp

Consumer Financial Protection
http://www.consumerfinance.gov/owning-a-home/

Corporation for Supportive Housing
http://csh.org/

CUHP (Constructing Understanding of the Homeless Population)
http://www.cuhp.org/

FEANTSA - Homeless in Europe
http://www.feantsa.org/

Guide to Getting Your First Mortgage
http://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/articles/2014/10/24/a-guide-to-getting-your-first-mortgage

Health & Human Services: Homeless
http://www.hhs.gov/homeless/

Help a Homeless Veteran
http://va.gov/homeless/help_a_homeless_veteran_general.asp?utm_source=adcenter&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=homeless%20shelters&utm_content=Shelters&utm_campaign=Search_Shelter_Housing

Home Base
http://www.homebaseccc.org/

Homeless
http://www.flickr.com/groups/homeless/

Homelessness: Programs and the People They Serve
http://www.huduser.org/portal/publications/homeless/homelessness/contents.html

Homeless People's Network Discussion List
http://hpn.asu.edu/

Homeless Publications - HUD USER
http://www.huduser.org/publications/povsoc.html

House of Hope
http://www.houseofhopeccd.org/

How to Pick the Best Home Inspectors and Appraisers
http://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/inspectors-and-appraisers/

How to Save on Homeowners Insurance
http://publications.usa.gov/epublications/12ways/12ways.htm

HUD's Homeless Outreach
http://www.hud.gov/homeless/index.cfm

Hunger and homelessness continues to rise in US cities
http://www.citymayors.com/features/uscity_poverty.html



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Institute for Research on Poverty
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/

Mortgages
http://www.moneygeek.com/mortgage/

National Alliance to End Homelessness
http://www.endhomelessness.org/

National Alliance to End Homelessness
http://naeh.org/

The National Center on Family Homelessness
http://www.familyhomelessness.org/

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE
http://center.serve.org/nche/

National Coalition for the Homeless
http://www.nationalhomeless.org/

National Coalition for Homeless Veterans
http://www.nchv.org/

National Health Care for the Homeless Council
http://www.nhchc.org/

National Homelessness Initiative Canada
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/homelessness/

National Housing Institute
http://www.nhi.org/

National Housing Law Project NHLP
http://www.nhlp.org

National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty
http://www.nlchp.org/

National Low Income Housing Coalition
http://www.nlihc.org

National Policy and Advocacy Council on Homelessness (USA)
http://www.npach.org/



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National Resource Center on Homelessness and Mental Illness
http://www.nrchmi.samhsa.gov/

National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness
http://www.studentsagainsthunger.org/

Noel House.org
http://www.noelhouse.org

Real Estate Market Reports and Trends
http://www.redfin.com/research/reports

Rebeccas Community
http://www.homeless.org.au/

Speak Easy.org
http://www.speakeasy.org

Strategies for Reducing Chronic Street Homelessness
http://www.huduser.org/portal/publications/homeless/chronic_homeless.html

Street Women.org
http://www.streetwomen.org

United States Department of Health and Human Services site on Homelessness
http://aspe.hhs.gov/homeless/

US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) - Homelessness
http://www.hud.gov/homeless/index.cfm

U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness
http://www.usich.gov/

Welfare Information Network - Homelessness
http://www.financeprojectinfo.org/WIN/homeless.asp

Women's Homeless Shelters IBIBLIO:
http://www.ibiblio.org/rcip/women.html

What Is 211?
http://211tbc.blogspot.com/2009/03/what-is-211.html

Women In Need
http://www.women-in-need.org/

Your Rights As A Home-buyer
http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/topics/buying_a_home



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