HOME
ECONOMICS
FAMILY
AND
CONSUMER
SCIENCE




HOME

WHAT IS HOME ECONOMICS?

CHARACTERISTICS OF HOME ECONOMICS

HOW TO BE A HOME ECONOMICS TEACHER

HOW TO BECOME A HOME ECONOMICS TEACHER

HOW TO BECOME A HOME ECONOMICS TEACHER LINKS

FAMILY CONSUMER SCIENCE

HOME ECONOMIC REVOLUTION

HOME ECONOMIC LINKS



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SECTION 1



HOME




A home is a place of residence or refuge.
It is usually a place where an individual
or a family can rest in and be able to
store personal property.

Modern households contain sanitary
facilities and a means of preparing
food.

There are certain cultures which lack
permanent homes, such as with nomadic
people.

While a house (or other residential
dwelling) is often referred to as a
"home", the concept of "home" is a
much broader idea which exceeds the
denotation of a physical dwelling.

A home is often a place of refuge
and safety, where worldly cares fade
and the things and people that one
loves becomes the focus.

Many people think of home in terms
of where they grew up, and home can
even be a time rather than a place.



HOME
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home



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SECTION 2



WHAT
IS
HOME
ECONOMICS?




The term "home economics" may call up stereotypical
images of girls busily sewing and cooking in 1950s
classrooms, images that have led many people to view
this field as fundamentally narrow, dull, and socially conservative.

In the 1960s and 1970s, the women's movement was often
critical of home economics, seeing it as a discipline
that worked to restrict girls and women to traditional
domestic and maternal roles.

More recently, however, researchers in the field of
women's history have been reevaluating home economics,
developing an understanding of it as a profession that,
although in some ways conservative in its outlook,
opened up opportunities for women and had a broad
impact on American society.

Although the term "home economics" did not come
into wide usage until the early twentieth century,
efforts to formalize and teach principles of
domesticity go back to the mid-1800s. Increases
in literacy and in the availability of printed
materials during the nineteenth century made
possible the emergence of a literature on
homemaking. One of the most influential early
examples was the Treatise on Domestic Economy for
the Use of Young Ladies at Home (1841), written
by Catharine Beecher (1800-1878), an educator and
social reformer who was a half-sister of the
abolitionist Harriet Beecher Stowe. Beecher argued
for the importance of domestic life and sought to
apply scientific principles to childrearing, cooking,
and housekeeping, and she also advocated access to
liberal education for young woman, although she
opposed female suffrage on the grounds that women
should leave the public sphere to men.

Other forerunners of home economics were the cooking
schools that began coming into being in the 1870s.
Women such as Maria Parloa and Fannie Farmer, both
of whom taught at the famous Boston Cooking School,
offered instruction in preparing healthful, low-cost
meals. At first they provided training mainly for
professional cooks, but over time they opened up
their classes to an eager general public. Teachers
during this period also published some of the first
cookbooks directed at a large popular audience.



What is Home Economics?
http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/about.html


Home Economics Archive:

Subjects Covered In This Collection


Applied Arts and Design

Applied Or Decorative Art
Crafts Furniture (Design,
Upholstery, Refinishing, Repair)


http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/applied.html

Child Care

Parenting Child/Human Devel
Human Sexuality Public Policy
Related To The Above Topics


http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/child.html

Clothing Production And Upkeep

(Including Sewing And Laundry
Work) Fashion And Clothing
Choice Textile/Fiber Science
Fashion Design


http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/textiles.html


Cookery / Home Cooking

(Including Home Processing And
Experimental Foods, But Excluding
Cookbooks) Nutrition And Dietetics
Food Science Marketing And Food
Purchasing


http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/food.html


Family Economics

(Including Budgets) Home Management
Efficiency (Ergonomics, Motion Studies)
Management Of Domestic Employees
Economics Of Household Production/Rural Enterprise
Economics As An Academic Discipline
Standard Of Living


http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/home_mgt.html

Housekeeping Manuals

(Not Including Laundry)
Etiquette


http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/housing.html

Housing

(Architecture, Siting, Construction,
But Only Publications Aimed At A Lay
Audience)
Interior Design (As Related To Efficiency
And Health)
Home Equipment
Housing Policy


http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/hfhe.html


Household Sanitation

Care Of The Sick
Personal Hygiene And Grooming
Public Health


http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/hygiene.html


Hospitality Industry

Institutional Nutrition
Service Agency Administration

http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/inst_mgt.html


Marketing/Merchandising

(Including Communicating With
Consumers,
Home Service Merchandising)
Other Retail Activities
Consumer Education, Protection,
And Advocacy
Consumer Co-Operatives


http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/retail.html


Home Economics Education

Home Economics Textbooks
Home Extension (As A Topic
In Itself-Extension Publications
Are Excluded)


http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/teaching.html




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SECTION 3



CHARACTERISTICS
OF
HOME
ECONOMICS




Home economics is a class offered to high school
students that teaches them how to effectively make
personal decisions regarding nutrition, child
rearing and other household issues.



Nutrition

Food and proper nutrition are a significant part
of the home economics curriculum. Students learn
food preparation, dietary guidelines as well as
etiquette.



Child Care


Home economics students are taught the importance and
responsibilities of raising a child. The students are
given an introduction of a variety of child development
theories and child rearing techniques.



Family Dynamics

The home economics curriculum helps students in
understanding the components of a family unit,
along with the responsibility of individual
members of the family.



Household Management

Students learn about being independent and
responsible. Some instructional techniques
include financial budgeting and time
management.



Consumerism

Students are taught to be smart shoppers by
knowing the difference between wants and needs.



Characteristics of Home Economics
http://www.ehow.com/facts_5548644_characteristics-home-economics.html#ixzz1uR3JNuZ6



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SECTION 4



HOW TO
BE A
HOME
ECONOMIC
TEACHER




Although the role of home economics teachers
has changed over the past decade, they are
still a valued part of many high schools,
community colleges and vocational schools.

In the past, home economics teachers focused
on teaching domestic skills to predominately
female students. Today, home economics has
evolved into a more well-rounded curricula
which also includes;


dietetics,

fitness,

child development,

education.



It is sometimes referred to as family and consumer
sciences. Becoming a home economics teacher requires
a bachelor's degree, teacher certification, and
possibly additional certification as required by the
school district in which you teach.



Instructions


1. Enroll in a bachelor's degree program in
family and consumer science, home economics,
or a related subject.


2. Enroll in a teacher preparation program.
Typically, home economics majors will enroll
in a secondary education teacher preparation
program, as most elementary schools do not
offer home economics.


3. Obtain a teaching license. Every state
requires teachers to be certified to teach
in the public schools. Most states require
a bachelor's degree as well as supervised
teaching experience in order to obtain a
license. Many states also have exams to
pass before a license is issued.




Tips & Warnings


The American Association of Family and Consumer
Sciences (AAFCS) offers additional certification
for home economics teachers. Requirements include
a bachelor's degree and passing one of three
National Family and Consumer Sciences exams.


Many states have alternative licensing procedures
for individuals who have not completed a teacher
education program. Requirements are usually a high
school diploma or a bachelor's degree in addition
to professional experience that would make someone
highly qualified to teach home economics.



How to Be a Home Economics Teacher
http://www.ehow.com/how_7302806_home-economics-teacher.html#ixzz1uQyooz4t



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SECTION 5



HOW TO
BECOME A
HOME
ECONOMIC
TEACHER




Qualifying to become a home economics teacher
generally requires a bachelor's degree. But if
you choose to teach the subject in a college
or university, you will need to acquire your
masters or doctorate degree.

Focusing on educating students in the areas of
food, nutrition and everyday living, the home
economics teacher plays a vital role in the
educational system. As a home economics teacher,
you will be providing students with the tools
necessary to make informed decisions about
domestic and consumer related situations.



Instructions


1. Earn your high school diploma or GED. In
order to attend an accredited college or
university you will need to complete this
step. Once you have fulfilled your high school
requirements, begin your search for a college
or university.


2. Attend a four year college or your local
community college. Keeping in mind that most
community colleges only offer a two year
associates degree program. Once you have earned
your associates degree, you will need to transfer
your credits to a four year college in order to
complete an undergraduate degree. Classes for
Home Economics preparation include sociology,
psychology and economics. Other concentrations are
on diet, nutrition and family dynamics. It's at
this time that you want to specialize your studies.


3. Complete a bachelor degree program through an
accredited college program. Schools that are in
need of hiring a home economics teacher will be
requiring a teaching certificate. In order to
qualify for the certificate, you will need to have
a bachelor's degree. A Bachelor of Science in
Economics is the degree that is required in most
instances. This will offer a concentration in oral
and written skills, creative thinking, and the
ability to present ideas to your students as a Home
Economics teacher.


4. Increase your odds of getting hired by adding to
your educational profile. Achieving a certification
in family and consumer science will give you an extra
edge when it comes to competing for a teaching position.
Home economic teachers that have completed a four year
degree can sit for the examination offered by the
American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences in
order to get this extra certification.


5. Continue your education by completing a master's or
doctorate degree in order to teach home economics in a
college or university. If you wish to expand your
horizons and venture into the realm of higher learning,
earn a higher degree in home economics. The additional
degrees will afford you the opportunity to share your
knowledge and prepare others in the field of teaching
home economics.



Tips & Warnings


A career in home economics is not limited to general
classroom teaching. Those with a background in home
economics can broaden their career choices by venturing
out into other related programs like food demonstrating,
hospitality, textile art, and the tourism industry.

Be careful when choosing a college or university in pursuit
of your degree. Some online schools may not be accredited,
and that can limit your prospective career choices in the
future.



How to Become a Home Economics Teacher
http://www.ehow.com/how_4587694_become-home-economics-teacher.html



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SECTION 6



HOW TO
BECOME A
HOME
ECONOMIC
TEACHER
LINKS




Economics Activities for High School
http://www.ehow.com/list_6579094_economics-activities-high-school.html

Food-Applied Nutrition of Home Economics
http://www.ehow.com/about_6708899_food_applied-nutrition-home-economics.html

Home Economics Classroom Activities
http://www.ehow.com/list_6311191_home-economics-classroom-activities.html

Home Economics Teacher Qualifications
http://www.ehow.com/info_7964783_home-economics-teacher-qualifications.html

How to Create a Home Economics Life Skills Class
http://www.ehow.com/how_5924834_create-economics-life-skills-class.html

How to Home School Effectively
http://www.ehow.com/how_4448483_home-school-effectively.html

How to Teach Home Economics
http://www.ehow.com/how_5458798_teach-home-economics.html

How to Train in Home Economics
http://www.ehow.com/how_6926130_train-home-economics.html



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SECTION 7



FAMILY
AND
COMSUMER
SCIENCE




Family and consumer science is an academic
discipline that combines aspects of social
and natural science.

Family and consumer science deals with the
relationship between individuals, families,
and communities, and the environment in
which they live. The field represents many
disciplines including:



consumer science,

nutrition,

parenting,

human development,

interior design,

textiles,

apparel design,

family economics

as well as other
related subjects.



Family and consumer science is also known
as human sciences, human ecology, or home
economics.



FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_and_consumer_science



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SECTION 8



HOME
ECONOMIC
REVOLUTION




There is more to learn
in home economics classes
these days than how to
hard-boil an egg.

You can start by learning
a new name for this domestic
course.

Home ec has been shoved
aside for its new moniker:
"family and consumer sciences."



HOMEE ECONOMIC REVOLUTION
http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2001/schools/stories/homeec.revolution.html



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SECTION 9



HOME
ECONOMIC
FAMILY
AND
COMSUMER
SCIENCE
LINKS




American Association of Family and Consumer Science (AAFCS)
http://www.aafcs.org/

The American Association for Marriage
and Family Therapy (AAMFT)

http://www.aamft.org/

The American Association of Textile
Chemists and Colorists

http://www.aatcc.org/

American Society for Nutrition
http://www.nutrition.org/

The Association for Career and
Technical Education (ACTE)

http://www.acteonline.org

Association for Consumer Research
http://www.acrweb.org/

American Dietetic Association
http://www.eatright.org/

Bridgewater College
http://www.bridgewater.edu/


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College of Family & Consumer Sciences
http://www.fcs.uga.edu/

College of Home Economics
http://www.upd.edu.ph/~che

College of Human Sciences
http://www.chs.fsu.edu

Family & Consumer Sciences
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/fcs/

Home Ec 101
http://www.home-ec101.com/

Home Economics
http://www.pearables.com/home_economics.htm

Home Economics Careers
& Technology Education

http://www.hect.org/

Home Economics Institute
of Australia

http://www.heia.com.au

Home Economics Lesson Plans
http://www.teach-nology.com/teachers/lesson_plans/vocational_ed/home/

International Federation
of Home Economics

http://www.ifhe.org


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Journal of Family and Consumer
Sciences Education JFCSE

http://www.natefacs.org/JFCSE/jfcse.htm

KIlmarnock Academy Home Economics
http://www.kilmarnockacademy.co.uk/staffhomeeconomics.htm

Money Geek
http://www.moneygeek.com/

National Association for the
Education of Young Children

http://www.naeyc.org/

The National Association
for Family Child Care

http://www.nafcc.org/

National Council on Family
Relations (NCFR)

http://www.ncfr.org/

National Education Association NEA
http://www.nea.org/

National Extension Association of
Family and Consumer Sciences

http://www.neafcs.org/

National Science Teachers Association
http://www.nsta.org/



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