HEMP
INDIAN HEMP
CANNABIS




FACTS

INDIAN HEMP

HEMP PLANT

HEMP MILK

HEMP VS MARIJUANA

HEMP LINKS



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SECTION 1



FACTS




HEMP

“Hemp/industrial hemp” and “marijuana”
are two distinct varieties of the same plant
species.


“Hemp”
is a fiber crop.

“Marijuana”
is a drug crop.


However, these definitions have become
confused in the last 60 years. Recently,
a movement has begun to distinguish the
terms again.
It is important to understand the history
of the usage of these terms in order to
eliminate the confusion.


Hemp has been grown for at least the last
12,000 years for fiber (textiles and paper)
and food. It has been effectively prohibited
in the United States since the 1950s.

George Washington and Thomas Jefferson both
grew hemp. Ben Franklin owned a mill that made
hemp paper. Jefferson drafted the Declaration
of Independence on hemp paper.

When US sources of "Manila hemp" (not true hemp)
was cut off by the Japanese in WWII, the US Army
and US Department of Agriculture promoted the
"Hemp for Victory" campaign to grow hemp in the
United States.

Because of its importance for sails (the word
"canvass" is rooted in "cannabis") and rope for
ships, hemp was a required crop in the American
colonies.

Which of these two resources produce more paper:
hemp plants or trees?
Hemp wins this one quite easily. For a field 1
square km big (about 256 acres), hemp produces
4 times more paper than trees using a field the
exact same size. Even more surprising is that it
takes 80 times longer for trees to grow (20 years
compared to 3 months for hemp).

Only hydrogen and water is needed to make
hemp paper, nothing that could hurt the
ecosystem. Tree paper needs chlorine and
strong acids to hold the fibers together.
All this mess goes in the water we drink
every day. Hemp fibers are large enough to
hold together for a longtime, while resisting
to moisture and wear.


Interesting fact:
The first bible was written on an hemp parchment.
Wood paper can be recycled about 3 times but
hemp paper can be recycled up to 8 times! Hemp
is the only non-wood source for paper that can
cover world wide production.




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SECTION 2



INDIAN
HEMP




INDIAN
HEMP

'Indian hemp' can also refer to
another species called Hibiscus
cannabinus, which is used for
its fibre.

Probably one of the oldest plants
known to man, Cannabis was cultivated
for fiber, food, and medicine thousands
of years.

Fiber is not the only ancient use of
this plant, it was also an important
food plant.

It was formerly listed
as one of the five major
grains along with:
millet,
rice,
barley,
soybeans.


Cannabis was also known for having
medicinal properties. The drug was
used as a cure for various diseases,
and as an effective pain killer.



Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Ethnobotanical Leaflets

http://www.siu.edu/~ebl/leaflets/hemp.htm/



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SECTION 3



HEMP
PLANT




HEMP
PLANT

You may be wondering why you
would choose clothing made
from hemp over clothing made
from "traditional" fabrics.

For one thing, hemp is as
traditional a fabric as you
can find.

The hemp plant is the oldest cultivated
fiber plant known, with a history of
use in textiles and fabrics dating
back as far as 8000 BC.

The reasons for hemp's continued
popularity throughout ten millenia
are still applicable today, and are
the basis for the renewed interest
in its cultivation and use.


The hemp plant produces
the strongest natural
fiber known.

Hemp fabric is three
times stronger than
cotton fabric of the
same weight;

it is also warmer,
more absorbent,
longer wearing.

A crop of hemp requires
no application of
herbicides.

With a density of 200
to 300 plants per
square meter, there
is no available room
or light for weeds
to grow.

The hemp plant also
has no need of
pesticides.

It has no known insect
enemies and is also
highly resistant to
disease.



Hemp Sisters Inc.
http://www.hemp-sisters.com/



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SECTION 4



HEMP
MILK




Hemp milk or hemp seed milk, is a drink made from hemp seeds that
are soaked and ground into water, yielding a creamy nutty beverage.
It is marketed in health and fitness publications as a "new health
food darling".

Hemp seeds contain no or only trace amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol
(THC), the psychoactive substance found in the related varieties of
the Cannabis plant. Hemp seeds contain a three-to-one ratio of
omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids and other nutrients include
magnesium, phytosterols, ascorbic acid, beta-carotene, calcium, fiber,
iron, potassium, phosphorus, riboflavin, niacin and thiamin.

Hemp milk also contains 10 essential amino acids, making it a good
vegan source of protein as hemp protein does not contain phytates,
enzyme inhibitors found in some soy protein that can interfere with
the absorption of essential minerals. Hemp protein may also be more
digestible than soy protein because unlike soy, it does not contain
oligosaccharides, complex sugars that can cause flatulence if not
properly broken down during digestion.



Hemp milk
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp_milk



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SECTION 5



HEMP
VS
MARIJUANA




HEMP
MARIJUANA


Hemp is different from marihuana.

The hemp plant contains only .09% THC,
whereas drug-quality plants contain
7 to 10% of this notorious chemical.

The hemp stalk, which is the source
of pulp used for paper production,
contains no psychoactive elements.


Historically, hemp has
been used to produce:
rope,
cloth,
paper,
food,
medicine.

The mature plants
even look quite
different,

the marijuana plant
is a shrub;

the hemp plant is
a stock that grows
to between 6 and
16 feet tall.



Ylana
http://www.ylana.com/



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SECTION 6



HEMP
LINKS




ABUNDANT EARTH
http://www.abundantearth.com/

Agricenter International
http://www.agricenter.org/

The Benefits of Organic Hemp Milk
http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/benefits-of-hemp-milk/

Erowid
http://www.erowid.org/

GLOBAL HEMP
http://www.globalhemp.com/

GLOBAL HEMP
http://www.hemp.co.uk/

Hemp Industries
http://www.hempindustries.org/

Hemp Industries Association (HIA)
http://www.thehia.org/

THE HEMP FILES
http://www.hempfiles.com/



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HEMP FLAX
http://www.hempflax.com/

HEMP INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION
http://www.thehia.org/

THE HEMP REPORT
http://www.hempreport.com/

Hemp Sisters Inc
http://www.hemp-sisters.com/

HEMP PLANET
http://www.hempplanet.com/

HEMP UNION
http://www.hemp-union.karoo.net/

INDUSTRIAL HEMP
http://www.industrialhemp.net/

INTERNATURAL
http://www.internatural.com/



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MARIJUANA HEMP
CANNABIS MAGAZINE

http://www.marijuana-kemp.com/

MARIHEMP
http://www.marihemp.com/

NATURAL HEMPASIS
http://www.hemphasis.com/

NORTH AMERICAN INDUSTRIAL
HEMP COUNCIL

http://www.naihc.org/

nova-Institute GmbH
http://www.nova-Institut.de/engl_selbstdarstellung.htm/

Organic Trade Association
http://www.ota.com/

OLD GROWTH FREE
http://www.oldgrowthfree.com/

PLANT CULTURES
http://www.plantcultures.org.uk/

Purdue University's New Crop Directory
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/

Rethink Paper
http://www.rethinkpaper.org/

Vote Hemp
http://www.votehemp.com/

Ylana
http://www.ylana.com/



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