FERMENTATION
IN FOODS




FERMENTATION IN FOOD PROCESSING

HOW TO FERMENT VEGETABLES

FERMENTATION IN FOOD PROCESSING LINKS



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SECTION 1



FERMENTATION
IN FOOD
PROCESSING




Fermentation in food processing is the conversion of carbohydrates to
alcohols and carbon dioxide or organic acids using yeasts, bacteria,
or a combination thereof, under anaerobic conditions. Fermentation
usually implies that the action of microorganisms is desirable. The
science of fermentation is also known as zymology or zymurgy.

The term "fermentation" is sometimes used to specifically refer to the
chemical conversion of sugars into ethanol, a process which is used to
produce alcoholic beverages such as wine, beer, and cider. Fermentation
is also employed in the leavening of bread (CO2 produced by yeast
activity); in preservation techniques to produce lactic acid in sour
foods such as sauerkraut, dry sausages, kimchi, and yogurt; and in
pickling of foods with vinegar (acetic acid).



Fermentation in food processing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermentation_in_food_processing



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SECTION 2



HOW TO
FERMENT
VEGETABLES




What is Lacto-fermentation? Lacto-fermentation is a method of food
preservation that also enhances the nutrient content of the food.
The action of the bacteria makes the minerals in cultured foods more
readily available to the body. The bacteria also produce vitamins
and enzymes that are beneficial for digestion.

Almost any vegetable can be fermented, and fermenting farm-fresh
produce is a great way to provide good nutrition year-round. Ferment
one vegetable alone or create mix of many different kinds, along with
herbs and spices, for a great variety of cultured foods.



Hereís what you need to get started:


1. Basic Equipment

The right equipment can make all the difference when getting started,
from a good chopping knife to the right fermentation vessel to fit your
needs. Consider carefully when choosing your equipment and supplies.



2. Preparing Vegetables

There are several ways to prepare the vegetables for fermenting: grating,
shredding, chopping, slicing, or leaving whole. The preparation method is
a personal choice, though some vegetables are better suited for leaving
whole, while others ferment better when shredded or grated.



3. Salt, Whey, or Starter Culture?

A recipe may call specifically for salt, salt and whey, or a starter culture.
The method chosen can vary, depending on personal taste, special dietary
requirements, and even the vegetables used. The information presented in this
article can help you decide between salt, whey, and starter cultures for
fermenting vegetables.

If salt fermentation is the preferred method, choose from the different kinds
of salt appropriate for culturing.



4. Water for Preparing Brine

Water used for preparing brine or starter culture should be as free from
contaminants as possible, for the best-tasting finished product. Consider
the points in this article before choosing your water source for culturing.



5. Weighing Vegetables Down Under the Brine

Once the vegetables have been prepared and placed in the chosen fermentation
vessel, weigh the vegetables down under the brine, keeping them in an anaerobic
environment during the fermentation period.



6. Moving to Cold Storage

Once the vegetables are finished culturing, itís time to move them to cold storage.
When new to fermenting, it may be difficult to know exactly when to consider the
vegetables finished. Follow these tips for deciding when vegetables are ready for
cold storage, to enjoy the finished vegetables for as long as possible.



7. Troubleshooting

As with any culturing process, each batch of fermented vegetables can turn out
differently. If the vegetables grow mold or yeast on top, use this guide to decide
what to do about mold and how to prevent it in future batches.



How to Ferment Vegetables: The Basic Culturing Process
http://www.culturesforhealth.com/how-to-naturally-culture-ferment-vegetables



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SECTION 3



FERMENTATION
IN FOOD
PROCESSING
LINKS




Busting Lacto-fermentation Myths
http://www.culturesforhealth.com/busting-lacto-fermentation-myths

Cultured Vegetable Recipe Page
http://www.culturesforhealth.com/cultured-vegetable-fruit-condiment-recipes

Fall Fermented Vegetables
http://www.culturesforhealth.com/fall-fermented-vegetable-recipes

Fermented carrot sticks
http://www.culturesforhealth.com/naturally-fermented-cultured-carrot-sticks-recipe

Fermented garlic cloves
http://www.culturesforhealth.com/lacto-fermented-garlic-cloves-recipe

Fermented radishes
http://www.culturesforhealth.com/lacto-fermented-radishes-recipe

Fermented Vegetable Expert Advice Articles and Recipes
http://www.culturesforhealth.com/cultured-fermented-vegetables-fruits-condiments-articles-videos-recipes

Fermentn
https://fermentn.com/

Fermentools
http://www.fermentools.com/

Health Benefits of Fermented Foods
https://wellnessmama.com/2245/fermented-food-benefits/

Making Fermented Garlic
https://learningandyearning.com/making-fermented-garlic-and-ways-to-use-it/

Oh Lardyís Guide to Fermenting Fruits and Vegetables
http://ohlardy.com/oh-lardys-guide-fermenting-fruits-vegetables/

Sauerkraut
http://www.culturesforhealth.com/sauerkraut



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The Grocer's Encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grocer%27s_Encyclopedia/




What Eats?
http://www.whateats.com/




Fermentation in food processing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermentation_in_food_processing




Portal:Agriculture and Agronomy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Agriculture_and_Agronomy




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