ELECTRONIC
RECYCLING




RECYCLE
REDUCE
REPAIR
REUSE




RECYCLING

ELECTRONICS

ELECTRONIC WASTE

SUBSTANCES IN E-WASTE

APPLICATION ELEMENTS SUBSTANCES

RECYCLING GRANTS LINKS

ELECTRONIC RECYCLING LINKS



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SECTION 1



RECYCLING




Recycling is the reprocessing of
those used materials that would
otherwise become waste in order
to break them down and remake
them into new products.



Recyclable materials, also called
"recyclables" or "recyclates", may
originate from a wide range of
sources including the home and
industry.




RECYCLE




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SECTION 2



ELECTRONICS




Electronics is the study of the flow of
charge through various materials and
devices such as:


semiconductors,
resistors,
inductors,
capacitors,
nano-structures,
vacuum tubes.


Although considered to be a theoretical
branch of physics, the design and the
construction of electronic circuits to
solve practical problems is an essential
technique in the fields of electronic
engineering and computer engineering.

The study of new semiconductor devices
and surrounding technology is sometimes
considered a branch of physics.



Electronics
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronics



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SECTION 3



ELECTRONIC
WASTE
E-WASTE




Electronic waste,
"e-waste"
"Waste Electrical,
Electronic Equipment" ("WEEE")


is a waste type consisting of any broken
or unwanted electrical or electronic
appliance. Recyclable electronic waste
is sometimes further categorized as a
"commodity" while e-waste which can not
be reused is distinguished as "waste".

Both types of e-waste have raised concern
considering that many components of such
equipment are considered toxic and are not
biodegradable.


Some activists define
"Electronic waste"
to include all:

secondary computers,
entertainment devices electronics,
mobile phones,
other items,
whether they have been, sold,
donated, or discarded by
their original
owner.

This definition includes:

used electronics
which are destined for,
reuse,
resale,
salvage,
recycling,
disposal.


Others define the reusable
(working and repairable electronics)
and secondary scrap (copper, steel,
plastic, etc.) to be "commodities",
and reserve the use of the term
"waste" for residue or material which
was represented as working or repairable
but which was discarded by the buyer.




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SECTION 4



SUBSTANCES
CONTAINED
IN
ELECTRONIC
WASTE
E-WASTE




SUBSTANCES
IN
BULK




Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs),
polyvinyl chloride (PVC),
thermosetting plastics,
epoxy resins,
fibre glass.




ELEMENTS
IN
BULK




Lead,
tin,
copper,
silicon,
carbon,
iron,
aluminium.




ELEMENTS
IN
SMALL
AMOUNTS




Cadmium,
mercury,
thallium




ELEMENTS
IN
TRACE
AMOUNTS




Americium,
antimony,
arsenic,
barium,
beryllium,
bismuth,
boron,
cobalt,
europium,
gallium,
germanium,
gold,
indium,
lithium,
manganese,
nickel,
niobium,
palladium,
platinum,
rhodium,
ruthenium,
selenium,
silver,
tantalum,
terbium,
titanium,
vanadium,
yttrium.




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SECTION 5



APPLICATIONS
OF
ELEMENTS
AND
SUBSTANCES




Almost all electronics contain:
lead and tin (as solder),
copper (as wire and PCB tracks),
though the use of lead-free solder
is now spreading rapidly.



Lead:
solder,
CRT monitors (lead in glass),
lead-acid batteries

Tin:
solder

Copper:
copper wire,
printed circuit board tracks

Cadmium:
light-sensitive resistors,
corrosion-resistant alloys
for marine,
aviation environments

Aluminium:
nearly all electronic goods
using more than a few watts
of power (heatsinks)

Iron:
steel chassis,
cases and fixings

Silicon:
glass, transistors,
ICs,
printed circuit boards.

Nickel and cadmium:
nickel-cadmium batteries

Lithium:
lithium-ion battery

Zinc:
plating for steel parts

Gold:
connector plating,
primarily in computer equipment

Americium:
smoke alarms
(radioactive source)

Germanium:
1950s1960s transistorised
electronics (bipolar junction
transistors)

Mercury:
fluorescent tubes
(numerous applications),
tilt switches
(pinball games, mechanical
doorbells, thermostats)

Sulphur:
lead-acid batteries

Carbon:
steel,
plastics,
resistors.

In almost all
electronic equipment.



E-waste
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-waste



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SECTION 6



ELECTRONIC
RECYCLING
GRANTS
LINKS




Free Grant Search
http://www.FreeGrantSearch.com/

ND recycling grant solid waste
http://www.ndswra.org/grants.htm/

USA Government Grants
http://www.USAGovernmentGrants.Org/



GRANTS





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SECTION 7



ELECTRONIC
RECYCLING
LINKS




Computer Recycling Sites
http://www.computerrecyclingusa.com/

Computer Take Back Campaign
http://www.computertakeback.com/

Consumer Computer and Electronic Recycling Program
http://www.recycleapc.com/

Earth 911
http://www.earth911.org/

Department of Environmental Protection
http://www.epa.gov/

E-cycling Central
http://www.eiae.org/

Electronics Recycling
http://www.electronicsrecycling.org/

Electronics Recycling
http://www.lei-inc.net/



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Electronic Recycling Association of Alberta
http://www.electronicrecyclingassociation.com/

Electronic Recycling and Trading, Inc. ERT
http://www.ertinc.net/

e-Waste Guide
http://ewasteguide.info/

Industry Council For Electronic Equipment Recycling (ICER)
http://www.icer.org.uk/

Federal Electronics Challenge
http://www.federalelectronicschallenge.net/

Foreign Policy Magazine
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/

Greener Choices.org
http://www.greenerchoices.org/

Green Citizen
http://www.greencitizen.com/



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Greener Computing
http://www.greenercomputing.com/

THE GREEN GUIDE
http://www.thegreenguide.com/

Greenpeace Electronic Waste Campaign
http://www.greenpeace.org/international/

International Association of Electronics Recyclers
http://www.iaer.org/

Luminous Recycling
http://www.luminousrecycling.com/

Office of the Federal Environmental Executive
http://www.ofee.gov/

The Secret Life of Cell Phones
http://www.secret-life.org/

Tech Soup
http://www.techsoup.org/



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US Composting Council
http://compostingcouncil.org/index.cfm

US EPA's 'eCycling'
http://www.epa.gov/ecycling/

The Used Computer Mall
http://www.usedcomputer.com/

World Environmental Organization
http://www.world.org/



Recycling
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recycling





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