EARLY
CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT




CHILD DEVELOPMENT

WHAT IS CHILD DEVELOPMENT?

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

TOP 5 STRATEGIES TO TEACHING YOUR CHILDREN TO BEHAVE

TOPIC IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT

MANNERS YOUR KID SHOULD KNOW BY AGE 5

5 TABLE MANNERS RULES EVERY KID SHOULD KNOW

GOOD MANNERS RELATED LINKS

EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT LINKS



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SECTION 1



CHILD
DEVELOPMENT




Child development refers to the biological, psychological and
emotional changes that occur in human beings between birth and
the end of adolescence, as the individual progresses from
dependency to increasing autonomy. It is a continuous process
with a predictable sequence yet having a unique course for every
child.

It does not progress at the same rate and each stage is affected
by the preceding types of development. Because these developmental
changes may be strongly influenced by genetic factors and events
during prenatal life, genetics and prenatal development are usually
included as part of the study of child development. Related terms
include developmental psychology, referring to development throughout
the lifespan, and pediatrics, the branch of medicine relating to the
care of children. Developmental change may occur as a result of
genetically-controlled processes known as maturation, or as a result
of environmental factors and learning, but most commonly involves an
interaction between the two. It may also occur as a result of human
nature and our ability to learn from our environment.

There are various definitions of periods in a child's development,
since each period is a continuum with individual differences regarding
start and ending.



Child development
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development



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SECTION 2




WHAT
IS
CHILD
DEVELOPMENT?




Child development is a process every child goes through. This process
involves learning and mastering skills like sitting, walking, talking,
skipping, and tying shoes. Children learn these skills, called
developmental milestones, during predictable time periods.

Children develop skills in five main areas of development:



1. Cognitive Development

This is the child's ability to learn and solve problems. For example,
this includes a two-month-old baby learning to explore the environment
with hands or eyes or a five-year-old learning how to do simple math
problems.



2. Social and Emotional Development

This is the child's ability to interact with others, including helping
themselves and self-control. Examples of this type of development would
include: a six-week-old baby smiling, a ten-month-old baby waving bye-bye,
or a five-year-old boy knowing how to take turns in games at school.



3. Speech and Language Development

This is the child's ability to both understand and use language. For example,
this includes a 12-month-old baby saying his first words, a two-year-old
naming parts of her body, or a five-year-old learning to say "feet" instead
of "foots".



4.Fine Motor Skill Development


This is the child's ability to use small muscles, specifically their hands
and fingers, to pick up small objects, hold a spoon, turn pages in a book,
or use a crayon to draw.



5.Gross Motor Skill Development

This is the child's ability to use large muscles. For example, a six-month-old
baby learns how to sit up with some support, a 12-month-old baby learns to pull
up to a stand holding onto furniture, and a five-year-old learns to skip.



What is child development?
http://www.howkidsdevelop.com/developSkills.html



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SECTION 3



EARLY
CHILDHOOD
EDUCATION




Early childhood education is a branch of educational theory which
relates to the teaching of young children up until the age of about
eight, with a particular focus on education, notable in the period
before the start of compulsory education.



Early childhood education
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_childhood_education



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SECTION 4



EARLY
CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT




Early childhood development is defined as “a set of concepts, principles,
and facts that explain, describe and account for the processes involved
in change from immature to mature status and functioning”.

Development is generally divided into three broad categories: physical
development, cognitive development, and social emotional development.
Physical development addresses any change in the body, including how
children grow, how they move, and how they perceive their environment.

Cognitive development pertains to the mental processes (e.g., language,
memory, problem solving) that children use to acquire and use knowledge.

Emotional and social development addresses how children handle
relationships with others, as well as understand of their own
feelings.



Early Childhood Development
http://www.education.com/reference/article/early-childhood-development/






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SECTION 5



TOP 5
STRATEPIES
TO TEACHING
YOUR
CHILDREN
TO BEHAVE




Children are great learning machines, but they learn more through
experience than they do from their parents talking.

Below are five strategies for teaching your children how to behave.


1. Teach children acceptable and unacceptable behavior immediately
after they have do or don’t do something. Don’t wait.

2. For important matters such as commands or instructions speak less;
one or two words for every year the child has been alive is more
effective than an elaborate rationale.

3. Be very clear. “Would or could you,” is not as clear as “you have to.”

4. Use positive motivation way more than punishment.

5. Create a positive learning environment. Four to five pleasant
interactions to one unpleasant direction.


“The general rule, especially as it pertains to behavior, is that
children learn by doing things,” says Dr. Pat Friman, Boys Town
Director of Clinical Research.

“They need what they have done to change their experience in certain
ways, primarily in a pleasant or unpleasant way.”



Top 5 Strategies to Teaching your Children to Behave
http://www.parenting.org/article/top-5-strategies-teaching-your-children-behave



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SECTION 6



TOPIC
IN
CHILD
DEVELOPMENT




Toddlers & Preschoolers
http://www.parents.com/toddlers-preschoolers/

Big Kids
http://www.parents.com/kids/

Parenting
http://www.parents.com/parenting/

Food
http://www.parents.com/recipes/

Health
http://www.parents.com/health/

Fun
http://www.parents.com/fun/

Holiday
http://www.parents.com/holiday/

Physical Development
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/physical/

Intellectual Development
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/intellectual/

Behavioral Development
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/behavioral/

Social Development
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/social/

Learning Disabilities
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/learning-disabilities/

Gifted Children
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/gifted/

Friends
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/friends/

Shyness
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/shy/

Puberty
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/puberty/

25 Manners Kids Should Know
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/social/25-manners-kids-should-know/

Why Are Kids So Angry?
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/behavioral/why-are-kids-so-angry/

Understanding Your Kid's Fears
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/behavioral/understanding-kid-fears/

Is Your Kid Too Busy?
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/social/time-management-for-kids/

4 Ways to Discipline Ungrateful Children
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/behavioral/discipline-ungrateful-children/

Understanding Your Child's Height
http://www.parents.com/toddlers-preschoolers/development/physical/tall-or-short/

11 Basic Manners Kids Often Forget
http://www.parents.com/kids/responsibility/manners/manners-kids-often-forget/

Class, Dismissed: When Kids Hate School
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/intellectual/when-kids-hate-school/

6 Ways to Motivate Your Kids
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/behavioral/motivate-your-kids/

How to Improve Attention Spans
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/intellectual/how-to-improve-attention-spans/



Topics in Child Development
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/




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SECTION 7



MANNERS
YOUR CHILD
KID
SHOULD KNOW
BY AGE 5




Kids are never too young to learn manners. In fact, in a day
and age when we are seeing more teenagers lacking in the manner
department, it seems more important than ever that the parents
of young kids start early in teaching their children how to
interact with the world.

The truth is your child will get further in life, and will be
more respected by adults and playmates alike, if they learn
manners.

Whenever I see a child without a clue about how to act in public,
or how to interact with adults I immediately blame the parents.
Very young children are not just developmentally ready, but eager
to learn how to appropriately engage with others socially.



1. How to say please. And thank you.

Please and thank you, in the words of Barney the purple dinosaur,
truly are the magic words. And this little tidbit of mannerly
behavior can be taught even before your child is able to talk.
Making please and thank you a habit in the home, makes these
courtesies a habit in life.



2. How to cover your mouth when you sneeze or cough.

Spittle flying from little noses and mouths is just plain gross.
Trust me; teachers appreciate children who know this before they
get to school.



3. How to ASK before taking.

There is nothing more disturbing than a child who hasn’t yet
learned that they aren’t the center of the universe. Children
should ASK before taking something that is not theirs, and this
includes mom and dad’s stuff.



4. How to say sorry: for real.

Not the kind of “I’m sorry” that means nothing because they were
forced to say it by an angry parent. Empathy is definitely a
life skill.



5. How to KNOCK on doors before entering.

And this includes the bathroom while mom is trying to take a poop
in private.



6. How to say “Excuse me!”

Children are naturally impatient. Far too often, you see parents
who jump every time their child interrupts them. Children need to
learn when they can and when they cannot interrupt people, and
should learn how to gently say “excuse me,” rather than insist on
incessant tapping and saying “Mama, Mama, Mama.”



7. How to sit quietly.

It’s rude to talk through an entire movie. Kids need to learn how
to calm down their wiggles and giggles in less than interesting
situations. Patience is a definitely a virtue.



8. Okay, so my dinner table is at times pure pandemonium.

Still, my kids know how to use their cutlery, and how NOT to talk
with their mouths full. And when we are not at home, manners are
a must – even for my 5 year old.



9. Not to make fun of people.

Toddlers and young children are notorious for pointing out gigantic
moles or fat people in public. But parents must teach children that
sometimes insults like these hurt feelings unnecessarily. It’s not
nice to make fun of people or point out their flaws.



10. How to be helpful and compassionate.

Hold a door open for someone that has their hands full. Ask their
teacher or parent if they need help with chores. Recognizing ways
to be helpful and compassionate to others is a gift that children
can learn early in life, one that will make them feel good about
themselves – and be well liked by others.And thank you.



Manners Your Kid Should Know By Age 5
http://www.everydayfamily.com/blog/tuesdays-top-10-manners-your-kid-should-know-by-age-5/



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SECTION 8




5 TABLE
MANNERS RULES
EVERY KID
SHOULD
KNOW




Table manners aren't always child's play


Every parent wants their child to behave well in any situation
and part of that is having proper table manners. What are the
most important manners for kids to adhere to? Here's a list
that will help you educate your kids on good table manners.


Good table manners are an important skill for kids to be learn
at an early age. From the lunchroom to the boardroom, kids will
throughout their life -- have to eat in front of others, and
that can forge a positive or a negative impression on others.
It's preferable that the impression be positive, of course.

"The lessons learned in the home over a meal will then travel
with the children to their friends' homes, where they will be
more welcome and more likely to be invited back if they are
polite, well-behaved and helpful at meals. Childhood manners
also travel to school, and later on to dates and the marriage
home," says Susanne M. Alexander, a character specialist and
contributor to Parents Connect.



Parents Connect
http://www.parentsconnect.com


So what are the most important dinner table manners and etiquette
for kids (and everyone!) to know?



1. Please and thank you

These two important phrases are the cornerstone of good manners,
period, and extend to table manners. They show gratitude and
appreciation instead of entitlement (and no one wants a child
or an adult with an entitlement complex. It's a huge turnoff
in life).

"When the family gathers together, it is an opportunity for the
children to learn courtesy by saying 'please' or 'thank you' or
waiting to speak until someone else is finished. Dinner-table
interactions are a good time to learn respect as each person has
the opportunity to share something about his or her day," says
Alexander.



2. Chewing 101

Across the board, etiquette experts agree that one of the most
important dinner table manners to teach is to chew with your
mouth closed. Encourage your children to do so by modeling it
yourself, and even showing them how. After all, no one wants
to see what's in there.



3. Speaking (without food)

Another important element of proper table manners that etiquette
experts recommend is to never speak with your mouth full. This
goes hand-in-hand with chewing with your mouth closed. At best,
it's distracting to speak to someone who has food in their mouth
and it can also be hard to understand people with food in their
mouth. At worst, it's very unappealing, to say the least.



4. Table skills

From where silverware should be placed to how it should be used,
knowing your way around the place setting is important in manners
and etiquette. "Knowing how to properly hold and use a fork and
knife not only gives a child a sense of accomplishment and
independence, it also allows a parent to better enjoy the meal.
The parents can also be assured that their child will impress any
adults they eat with," says Kathie B. Martin, APR, president of
The Etiquette School of Birmingham. Martin also advises that it's
important to know how to eat in a clean manner.



5. Consideration

Above all, good table manners are about consideration recognizing
that you aren't alone at the table and what you do affects others.
"The most important lesson in good table etiquette is always being
aware of your actions and understanding that you share the dining
experience with every diner at the table," says etiquette trainer
Stephanie Raimo of Manner House. "It is easy to put your napkin on
your lap or sip from the proper water glass, but true manners start
with consideration for others."




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SECTION 9



GOOD
MANNERS
RELATED
TOPICS



Kids and manners: Start with the basics
http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articles/814695/kids-and-manners-start-with-the-basics-1

How to teach your toddler table manners
http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articles/5632/how-to-teach-your-toddler-table-manners

Benefits of good manners go beyond the table
http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articles/805283/benefits-of-good-manners-go-beyond-the-table


5 table manners rules every kid should know
http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articles/817946/5-Table-manners-every-kid-should-know



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SECTION 10



EARLY
CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT
LINKS




Child Development
http://www.pbs.org/parents/child-development/

Child Development
http://www.parents.com/kids/development/

Child Development
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/child/

Child Development
http://www.childdevelopmentinfo.com/

Child Development
http://www.pbs.org/parents/child-development/

Child Development Guide
http://www.child-development-guide.com/

Communication preschool lesson plans
http://www.123child.com/lessonplans/other/communication.php

Developmental Psychology
http://www.devpsy.org

Early Childhood Care and Education UNESCO
http://www.unesco.org/en/early-childhood/

Early Childhood Development
http://www.education.com/reference/article/early-childhood-development/

Heckman Equation for Investing in Early Human Development
http://heckmanequation.org

It's the Parenting, Dodo
http://jari.podbean.com/2013/01/21/its-the-parenting-dodo/

Manners and Etiquette for Children
http://www.a-to-z-of-manners-and-etiquette.com/manners-and-etiquette-for-children.html

National Institute for Early Education Research
http://nieer.org/

National Institute for Early Education Research
http://nieer.org/

An Overview of Early Childhood Development
http://psychology.about.com/od/developmentalpsychology/ss/early-childhood-development.htm

Parenting.org
http://www.parenting.org/

Sandbox Learning
http://www.sandbox-learning.com/

Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD)
http://www.srcd.org/

Top 10 Table Manners Every Kid Should Know
http://beautyandbedlam.com/teaching-kids-table-manners/

World Association for Infant Mental Health
http://www.waimh.org/

World Organization for Early Childhood Education (OMEP)
http://www.worldomep.org/



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Difference Between
http://www.differencebetween.info/




Education.com
http://www.education.com/




Academic Educational Encyclopedia
Free Online educational encyclopedia
http://academickids.com/




Nick Jr.
http://www.nickjr.com/




Highlights Kids.com
http://www.highlightskids.com/




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EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES


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