CONVERSATION
CONVERSATIONAL
SMALL TALK
DIALOGUE




CONVERSATION

CONVERSATION OPENERS

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

DIALOGUE

CONVERSATION RELATED TOPICS

CONVERSATION SKILLS

TYPES OF COACHING CONVERSATIONS

CONVERSATION LINKS




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SECTION 1



CONVERSATION




Conversation is a form of interactive, spontaneous communication
between two or more people who are following rules of etiquette.

Conversation analysis is a branch of sociology which studies the
structure and organization of human interaction, with a more
specific focus on conversational interaction.




Advantages of conversation



Conversations are interactive because contributions to a conversation
are response reactions to what has previously been said.

Conversations are spontaneous because a conversation proceeds, to some
extent, and in some way, unpredictably. However, the scope of that
spontaneity may legitimately be somewhat pre-limited for the purpose
of expediency, e.g. a talk show or a debate.

Conversations follow rules of etiquette because conversations are social
interactions, and therefore depend on social convention. Failure to
adhere to these rules devolves, and eventually dissolves the conversation.

Conversations are sometimes the ideal form of communication, depending
on the participants’ intended ends. Conversations may be ideal when, for
example, each party desires a relatively equal exchange of information,
or when one party desires to question the other. On the other hand, if
permanency or the ability to review such information is important,
written communication may be ideal. Or if time-efficiency is most
important, a speech may be preferable.




Classification of conversation in groupings



Subject

Many conversations can be divided into four categories
according to their major subject content:


Conversations about subjective ideas, which often serve to
extend understanding and awareness.

Conversations about objective facts, which may serve to
consolidate a widely-held view.

Conversations about other people (usually absent), which
may be either critical, competitive, or supportive. This
includes gossip.

Conversations about oneself, which sometimes indicate
attention-seeking behaviour.


Practically, few conversations fall exclusively into one
category. Nevertheless, the proportional distribution of
any given conversation between the categories can offer
useful psychological insights into the mind set of the
participants.



Functions



Most conversations may be classified by their goal.
Conversational ends may, however, shift over the life
of the conversation.

Functional conversation is designed to convey information
in order to help achieve an individual or group goal.

Small talk is a type of conversation where the topic
is less important than the social purpose of achieving
bonding between people or managing personal distance.

Banter is non-serious conversation, usually between
friends, which may rely on humour or in-jokes at the
expense of those taking part. The purpose of banter
may at first appear to be an offensive affront to the
other person's face. However, people engaging in such
a conversation are often signaling that they are
comfortable enough in each others' company to be able
to say such things without causing harm. Banter is
particularly difficult for those on the autism spectrum
and those with semantic pragmatic disorder.



Conversation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversation



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SECTION 2



CONVERSATION
OPENER




A conversation opener is an introduction used to begin a conversation.
They are frequently the subject of guides and seminars on how to make
friends and/or meet people. Different situations may call for different
openers (e.g. approaching a stranger on the street versus meeting them
at a more structured gathering of people with like interests).

An opener often takes the form of an open-ended question, which can lead
to further comments or conversation as well as creating topics for future
conversations (e.g. "How's your mandrill doing?").

A closed-ended question (e.g. "Nice weather today, isn't it?") is regarded
as potentially less effective because it can be answered with a simple
"Mm-hmm," which is essentially a conversational dead end, requiring the
initiater of the conversation to start from scratch.



Conversation opener
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversation_opener



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SECTION 3



INTERPERSONAL
COMMUNICATION




Interpersonal communication is the process of sending
and receiving information.

This kind of communication is subdivided into dyadic
communication, Public speaking, and small-group
communication.



Interpersonal communication
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interpersonal_communication/



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SECTION 4



DIALOGUE




A dialogue (sometimes spelled dialog) is a reciprocal
conversation between two or more entities.

The etymological origins of the word creating concepts
such as flowing-through meaning) do not necessarily
convey the way in which people have come to use the
word, leading to the erroneous assumption that a
dialogue is necessarily between only two parties.



DIALOGUE
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialogue



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SECTION 5



CONVERSATION
RELATED
TOPICS




Chat
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chat

Conversation Theory
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversation_Theory

Speech (public address)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speech_%28public_address%29

Aizuchi
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aizuchi

Awkward silence
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Awkward_silence

Bohm Dialogue
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohm_Dialogue

Comments
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comments

Compulsive talking
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compulsive_talking

Conversation Theory
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversation_Theory

Conversational narcissism
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversational_narcissism

Dialogue
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialogue

Online chat
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_chat

Small talk
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_talk

Speech (public address)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speech_(public_address)

Oral communication
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Oral_communication




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SECTION 6



CONVERSATION
SKILLS




To Start:


1. Look at the person or persons that you want to talk with.

2. Address the people by their name.

3. Stand about an arm's length away from everyone.

4. Wait until there is a pause in the conversation for you
to start talking.

5. Try to add information to the conversation.



During the conversation:

1. Always look at the people. Check out their body language
and facial expressions.

2. You may change topics only when people are finished speaking
on that subject.

3. When you change a topic it should usually be related to what
you were speaking about earlier.

4. Ask questions about the topic.

5. Add information about the topic that you know.

6. Some people use touch to compliment their words, such as a
pat on the back.

7. Be animated by using lots of gestures.



Ending the conversation

1. Make sure everyone has had a chance to talk.

2. Use closing expressions, like "i see that class is starting."
Complement the other person. "You had really good ideas. It was
good talking with you."

4. Thank the other person, "thanks for sharing with me."

5. Use a final closing statement like, "O. K., see you later."

6. Many people close their conversations with a handshake.



CONVERSATION SKILLS
http://www.cccoe.net/social/SWPconversation.htm/



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SECTION 7



TYPES
OF
COACHING
CONVERSATIONS




Coaching can be thought of as different types of conversations.


Some of the conversation types are:


Active inquiry:

The ability to ask powerful, open-ended questions to have
the client and coach come up with fresh insights about how
to resolve challenges and get better.



Appreciative inquiry:

A sub-set of active inquiry in which you build in what’s
working and the positive.



Accountability:

Conversations to hold the client accountable for doing
what he says he will do and keeping commitments.



Coachability:

Keeping the client open to learning, coaching, and
getting better.



Sharing stories:

Stories are a powerful coaching tool. Every coach
needs a repository of stories about himself and
others who have overcome challenges, handled
difficult situations, and showed character and
resilience.



Acknowledgement:

An essential conversation to point out and
celebrate results that the client achieves.



Setting context:

Here, the coach helps the client understand
where they are, where they have been, and
where they are heading in the coaching process.



Contracting:

These are conversations that define the coaching
relationship, from the goals the client wants to
achieve to confidentiality, scope, and permission
to coach.



Value:

Conversations to confirm that the client is
getting value.



Types of coaching conversations
http://www.polishingpearls.com/2012/coaching-conversations-2/



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SECTION 8



CONVERSATION
LINKS




AFRAID OF SPEAKING A SPEECH
http://www.afraid-of-speaking-a-speech.com/

The Association for Business Communication
http://www.businesscommunicationconferences.org/

Conversation Cafe
http://www.conversationcafe.org/

Conversation and Communication
http://www.lessonsnips.com/lesson/communication

Conversation Starters
http://www.conversationtalk.com/

Conversation Topics
http://www.conversationexchange.com/resources/conversation-topics.php

Conversation types and conservation
http://www.academia.edu/187602/Conversation_types_and_conservation_Forms_of_recognition_and_cognitive_development

Conversations With God
http://www.cwg.org/

Creating Important Conversations in Schools
http://www.co-csdc.org/news/pdf/DataDrivenHandout.pdf

The different types of Conversation
http://blackinamerica.tumblr.com/post/41661362303/the-different-types-of-conversation

Different types of conversation in a successful relationship
http://keypoints-dictionary.com/different-types-conversation-relationship-key-points-key-words-key-phrases-go/

EARTHLING COMMUNICATION
http://www.earthlingcommunication.com/



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Fever Bee
http://www.feverbee.com/

Four Types Of Conversation
http://www.wageningenportals.nl/msp/tool/4-types-conversations

Humanising Language Teaching Magazine
http://www.hltmag.co.uk/

Hypebot
http://www.hypebot.com/

The Maitreyan Order of Hsien Tao
http://www.spirit-alembic.com

Mindrs
http://www.mindrs.com

Multi Dimensions
http://www.multidimensions.com/

National FragileX Foundation
http://www.fragilex.org/

Native American Prophecies
http://www.crystalinks.com/native_american.html

New Age Spirituality
http://www.religioustolerance.org/newage.htm

NEW CONVERSATIONS
http://www.newconversations.net/

Order of the White Lion
http://www.orderofthewhitelion.com/

The Power of Interpersonal Communication
http://www.safetyperformance.com/ThePowerofInterpersonalCommunication-DifferentialImpactofFiveTypesofConversation.pdf

The Power of Using Questions in Conversations
http://www.eruptingmind.com/how-to-use-questions-in-conversations/

Rainsnow
http://www.rainsnow.org/



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The Relationship Gym
http://www.therelationshipgym.com/

Sacred Wind
http://www.sacredwind.com/

The Sandbox Learning Company
http://www.sandbox-learning.com/

Settlement.Org
http://www.settlement.org/

The six types of Twitter conversations
http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/02/20/the-six-types-of-twitter-conversations/

Social Skills and Social Interaction Dynamics
http://www.sidwiki.com/

Teach-At-Home
http://www.teach-at-home.com/

TURNING TO ONE ANOTHER
http://www.turningtooneanother.net/

Two Blue Herons
http://www.twoblueherons.net/

WORK 911
http://www.work911.com/

World Light Fellowship
http://www.worldlightcenter.com/



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