COLLABORATE
COLLABORATIVE
COLLABORATION




COLLABORATE

COLLABORATION

EXAMPLES OF COLLABORATION

COLLABORATIVE SEARCH RNGINE

DIGITAL COLLABORATION

LEARNING CIRCLE

STUDY CIRCLE

HOW TO COLLABORATE

HOW TO COLLABORATE WITH OTHERS

HOW TO COLLABORATE TO RESOLVE CONFLICT

COLLABORATION LINKS



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SECTION 1



COLLABORATE




to work with another person or group in order
to achieve or do something

to give help to an enemy who has invaded your
country during a war



Collaborate
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/collaborate



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SECTION 2



COLLABORATION




Collaboration is working together to achieve
a goal. It is a recursive process where two
or more people or organizations work together
to realize shared goals, (this is more than
the intersection of common goals seen in
co-operative ventures, but a deep, collective,
determination to reach an identical objective)
— for example, an intriguing endeavor that is
creative in nature—by sharing knowledge,
learning and building consensus.

Most collaboration requires leadership, although
the form of leadership can be social within a
decentralized and egalitarian group. In particular,
teams that work collaboratively can obtain greater
resources, recognition and reward when facing
competition for finite resources. Collaboration is
also present in opposing goals exhibiting the notion
of adversarial collaboration, though this is not a
common case for using the word.

Structured methods of collaboration encourage
introspection of behavior and communication. These
methods specifically aim to increase the success
of teams as they engage in collaborative problem
solving. Forms, rubrics, charts and graphs are
useful in these situations to objectively document
personal traits with the goal of improving
performance in current and future projects.




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SECTION 3



EXAMPLES
OF
COLLABORATION




Classical examples
of collaboration




Trade
Community organization
Game theory
Military-industrial complex
Project management
Academia
Classical music



Contemporary examples


Arts
Art groups
Business
Education
Music
Entertainment
Publishing
Science
Medicine
Technology



Collaboration
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collaboration



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SECTION 4



COLLABORATIVE
SEARCH
ENGINE




Collaborative Search Engines (CSEs) are an
emerging trend for Web search and Enterprise
search within company intranets. CSEs let
users concert their efforts in information
retrieval (IR) activities, share information
resources collaboratively using knowledge tags,
and allow experts to guide less experienced
people through their searches. Collaboration
partners do so by providing query terms,
collective tagging, adding comments or opinions,
rating search results, and links clicked of
former (successful) IR activities to users
having the same or a related information need.



Collaborative search engine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collaborative_search_engine



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SECTION 5



DIGITAL
COLLABORATION




Digital Collaboration is using digital devices, open source data and
cloud technology to share knowledge, manage information and contribute
user-generated content to communities of people regardless of time or
place.

Dramatically different from traditional collaboration, it connects a
broader network of participants who can accomplish much more than they
would on their own.



Digital Collaboration
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_collaboration



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SECTION 6



LEARNING
CIRCLE




The use of a circle as both the organizational structure and descriptive
metaphor for a meeting of equals is likely to have been a part of our
history for as long as fire has. The learning circle is a mechanism for
organizing and honoring the collective wisdom of the group and is present
in many indigenous cultures. For example, in early native councils of
elders came together to understand problems in a spirit of shared community
in “wisdom circles.” The term Learning Circle has been used to describe
group efforts with clear links to social change . Over time and across
countries, civic organizations, neighborhood communities, trade unions,
churches and social justice groups have used the idea of learning circles
to empower their members to make choices and take action. The web can help
locate the many ways both present and past that groups have used the term
Study circle or Learning Circle as a form of adult and student education.



Learning circle
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_circle



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SECTION 7



STUDY
CIRCLE




A study circle is a small group of people who meet multiple times to
discuss an issue. Study circles may be formed to discuss anything
from politics to religion to hobbies. They are differentiated from
clubs by their focus on exploring an issue or topic rather than on
activities or socializing. When they emerged in the early twentieth
century they were based on a democratic approach to self-education
and were often linked to social movements concerned with temperance
or working class emancipation.



Study circle
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Study_circle



Collaborative method
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collaborative_method




Psych Wiki
http://www.psychwiki.com/wiki/Main_Page




Types of library
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Types_of_library




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SECTION 8



HOW TO
CILLABORATE




Collaboration is the act of joining together to make possible that
which cannot be accomplished alone. Whether you are collaborating
in the workplace, in school or as part of a creative project,
collaboration can both help and hurt a project, depending on how
it's done.



Method 1 of 2:


As a Team


1. Have a clear goal in mind.

Make sure everyone involved understands what the goal is and believes
that the goal is worthwhile. The overarching goal of collaboration is
to achieve something together that you would not be able to achieve
alone. Sometimes that's in the nature of the finished product, but
other times the gain is efficiency. Either way, the people who are
collaborating should have some kind of shared vision.



2. Create a results-driven structure
within your team that is appropriate
for the goal you want to achieve.


There are three kinds of teams that are commonly used, based on the type
of results desired: •Problem resolution teams The problem solvers. In order
for this team to work, it's especially important that members are able to
trust their co-collaborators in a secure atmosphere where they feel respected.
Brainstorming should be encouraged, which means people must be able to suggest
ideas without fear of getting immediately criticized.

•Creative teams The innovators. This team needs to be independent of established
systems and procedures, enabling them to explore new possibilities and alternatives.

•Tactical teams The implementers. This team needs to have a well-defined plan.



3. Give each member of the project a way to
define his or her own role on the team.


One way to approach this is to write down all the tasks that need to be carried out.
For each task, ask who's interested in that task, and write their names next to it.
Ideally, everyone will gravitate towards different roles, but many times a few roles
are in high demand, and a few roles are unpopular. A solution to this is to rotate
the most unpleasant roles (which are usually monotonous enough for this). Another
idea is to outsource the unpleasant task(s).



4. Establish a communications system.

Make sure it allows collaborators to discuss team issues in a relaxed environment.
Create ways of documenting issues raised and decisions made. Using wikis and shared
documents can help with keeping everyone in the loop.



5. Establish ways to monitor performance
and provide feedback.


Periodically, meet together to discuss ways to improve on the project. There should
be some metrics by which you can monitor your progress. It might be as simple as how
many pages of a book has been written, or as complex as a series of traffic analytics.
Try to identify any bottlenecks--that is, areas where something isn't getting done,
and that's slowing down the rest of the progress. If that bottleneck points to a single
person, do not attack; ask the person what is making his or her tasks difficult, and
seek ways to make it easier.



6. Seek consensus.

Disagreements are common in any group effort. When conflicts arise, seek consensus from
all members on resolution. It's important that every person in the group stands behind
the group decision, whether they agree with it or not.




Method 2 of 2:

As an Individual


1. Create a collaborative climate.

Prove that you are trustworthy. Respect others. Be consistent in your behavior and
the way you respond to others.



2. Be humble and open to others' ideas and suggestions.

The opposite of collaboration is a form of dictatorship, where one person tells
everyone else what to do, and nothing is open for discussion. Whereas a dictatorship
is ego-driven, collaboration thrives on the quelling of egos. You need to accept that
while your ideas might be good, someone else's ideas might be good too, and sometimes
even better.



3. Delegate tasks.

Rather than trying to do everything, it is best to divide and conquer. Let everyone
find his or her strength and work therein to contribute to the common goal. If you
feel overwhelmed, speak up.



4. Assume good faith.

Collaboration is based on the common good, and we work most effectively together on
the assumption of good faith of one another. If someone is not acting in good faith,
it will reveal itself soon enough. But if you point a finger mistakenly, the spirit
of collaboration can easily turn sour.




Tips


•Decisions should be made based on consensus.

•All ways review your work

•Don't rush just take your time

•Don't do too much of the work By Cooper

•Don't wait until the last minute to make improvements

•Have Multiple drafts

•When you don't agree, do not get violent or angry.



How to Collaborate
http://www.wikihow.com/Collaborate



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SECTION 9



HOW TO
COLLABORATE
WITH OTHERS




Why is it capital nowadays to work with others toward shared goals?


In the world's today, there is plenty of technology, plenty of venture
capital, plenty of entrepreneurs, plenty of money. The cutting-edge
knowledge grows through orchestrated, collaborative efforts. Doing well
in your job depends to a greater or lesser extent on the work of a web
of others. If you want to be successful in whatever you do, you need to
collaborate with others seeking out relationships that are mutually
beneficial.



Here are 4 tips to collaborate successfully with others.

•Build rapport with others. Rapport hinges on empathy and typically emerges
naturally in the course of casual conversation about family, children, sports,
and the stuff of life.

•Keep others in the loop. Draw all members into active and enthusiastic
participation. Motivation matters greatly. If members care and are committed
to the goals, they try harder and so they work better.

•Cultivate and maintain extensive informal networks. Mix your private life
with your work life. Many of your personal friendships can be made through
work, though it is clear that clarity and discipline should keep work and
private agenda from beginning entangled. People who restrict their conversation
to work matters do little to enlarge their web of relationships.

•Make and maintain personal friendships among work associates. A common failing
is that people are too protective of their own work time and agendas. They turn
down requests to help or to work cooperatively. By giving your time to any
association, you develop a positive attitude. This will help you to improve your
social intelligence.


The ability to lead a group working well together is a valuable talent. Every
high-functioning group certainly has at least one member with this talent.
Focus on relationships of trust and rapport and your performance will shine.



How to Collaborate With Others
http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Collaborate-With-Others&id=5105957



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SECTION 10



HOW TO
COLLABORATE
TO RESOLVE CONFLICT




Conflict in the workplace is sometimes seen as a positive in high-energy
environments like sports or journalism. Unfortunately, in most workplaces,
conflict gets in the way of getting the job done. Because people are not
machines, conflict resulting from misunderstandings or anger over a
promotion or demotion is inevitable. You can take steps to resolve conflict
and get things back on an even keel and a productive course.



Instructions


1. Get the problem out in the open. You can't address a problem that people
refuse to acknowledge.

2. Listen intently to the views of others about the problem. You already know
what you think; you need to get other opinions, even if they are opposite to
yours. Put yourself in the position of the person or people you are speaking
to. Try to understand their concerns.

3. Develop a shared purpose statement that addresses the problem. This will
change the problem from one between individuals to a group problem that
requires a collective solution.

4.Ask for employees' opinions as to a possible solution to the problem. You
do not necessarily have to use their suggestions, but brainstorming might
give you an idea for a way to address their concerns that would be acceptable
to all involved.

5.Choose the solution that best addresses elements of the shared purpose statement
the solution that works for all involved -- and establish protocols to evaluate its
effectiveness at a later date.



How to Collaborate to Resolve Conflict
http://www.ehow.com/how_7737819_collaborate-resolve-conflict.html#ixzz2pNY4ktbu



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SECTION 11



COLLABORATE
COLLABORATIVE
COLLABORATION
LINKS




The 5 Best Ways to Collaborate With Your Team
http://quickbase.intuit.com/blog/2013/06/12/the-5-best-ways-to-collaborate-with-your-team/

5 Ways Teachers Can Collaborate With Each Other
http://ezinearticles.com/?5-Ways-Teachers-Can-Collaborate-With-Each-Other&id=2521087

11 Ways to Collaborate More Effectively
http://www.cioinsight.com/it-strategy/messaging-collaboration/slideshows/11-ways-to-collaborate-more-effectively.html

Arts Education Collaborative
http://www.artsedcollaborative.org/

Biomedical Engineering Society
http://www.taylorcollaboration.org/2011/biomedical-engineering-society/

Breakthrough Collaborative
http://www.breakthroughcollaborative.org/

The Centre for Creative Collaboration
http://www.creativecollaboration.org.uk/

Collaborate effectively
http://www.drdavidfraser.com/benefits/collaborate-effectively/

Collaboration
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns1007/index.html

Collaborative for Educational Services
http://www.collaborative.org/



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Collaborative Learning Structures and Techniques
http://www.gdrc.org/kmgmt/c-learn/methods.html

Cross Cultural Collaborative
http://www.culturalcollaborative.org/

Effective Methods of Project Team Collaboration
http://cobaltpm.com/effective-methods-of-project-team-collaboration/

Everyday Democracy
http://www.everyday-democracy.org

The Film Collaborative
http://www.thefilmcollaborative.org/

GATE
http://www.opengatecollaboration.org/

Getting Students to Collaborate Effectively
http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/getting-students-to-collaborate-effectively.shtml

How Smart People Collaborate for Success
http://www.inc.com/kevin-daum/how-smart-people-collaborate-for-success.html

How to Collaborate
http://www.collaborativejustice.org/how.htm

How to Collaborate
http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/career_magazine/previous_issues/articles/2012_07_20/caredit.a1200082

How to collaborate effectively with colleagues
http://www.apa.org/science/about/psa/2012/10/effectively-collaborate.aspx

How to Collaborate — and How Not To
http://hollylisle.com/how-to-collaborate-and-how-not-to/

How To Collaborate Without Killing Someone
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jmaureenhenderson/2011/09/13/how-to-collaborate-without-killing-someone/

How to teach collaboration
http://voices.washingtonpost.com/answer-sheet/higher-education/willingham-how-to-teach-collab.html



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International Federation of Workers Education Association (IFWEA)
http://www.ifwea.org/

Methods of Collaboration
http://www.studymode.com/essays/Methods-Of-Collaboration-166090.html

National Adult Literacy Database
http://www.nald.ca/CLR/study/study.htm

The Nightingale Collaboration
http://www.nightingale-collaboration.org/

PRINCIPLES FOR COLLABORATION, COMMUNICATION
AND COOPERATION BETWEEN PRIVATE MENTAL
HEALTH SERVICE PROVIDERS

http://www.pmhccn.com.au/Portals/2/PublicDocuments/InformationSheets/PMHA%20Principles%20for%20Collaboration%20Communication%20and%20Cooperation.pdf

Structured or Unstructured Collaboration, Which is Better?
http://www.thefutureorganization.com/structured-unstructured-collaboration/

The SUPPORT Collaboration
http://www.support-collaboration.org/summaries.htm

Teacher Collaboration
http://teachercollaboration.org/

Two Techniques to Foster Collaboration Within a Group
http://www.joe.org/joe/2000august/tt4.php

Urban Special Education Leadership Collaborative
http://www.urbancollaborative.org/



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