CANNING
FRUIT
VEGETABLES




Canning, homemade, fruit, vegetable, dehydrating,
drying, preservation, preserves, foods, jam, jelly,
syrup, recipes, recipes fruit, jelly recipes,free,
apple butter, fruit jams, mixed fruit jam recipes,
marmalade, marmalade recipes, salting, sugar free,
sugar, compote, fruit compote, fruit syrup recipes.




FOOD PRESERVATION

METHODS

CANNING

PRESERVES

FRUIT PRESERVES

JAM

JELLY

MARMALASE

JELLY JAM LINKS

SYRUP

FOOD DEHYDRATORS

WATERMELON RIND PRESERVES

APPLE SAUCE

APPLE SAUCE LINKS

APPLE BUTTER

APPLE BUTTER LINKS

PICKLING

PICKLING LINKS

CRANBERRY

CRANBERRY LINKS

CANNING LINKS

FOOD PRESERVATION RESOURCES



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SECTION 1



FOOD
PRESERVATION




Food preservation is the process of treating and handling food
in a way that preserves its value as food. The main effort is
to stop or >greatly slow down spoilage to prevent foodborne
illness (e.g. salting, cooling, cooking); but some methods
preserve food with specific controlled spoilage (e.g. cheese,
wine).

While maintaining or creating nutritional value, texture and
flavour is important in preserving its value as food; this is
a culturally dependent determinant as what qualifies as food
fit for humans in one culture may not qualify in another

culture.


Common methods of applying
these processes include:

drying,

spray drying,

freeze drying,

freezing,

vacuum-packing,

canning,

preserving in syrup,

sugar crystallisation,

food irradiation,

adding preservatives
or inert gases such as
carbon dioxide.

Other methods that not
only help to preserve food,
but also add flavour,
include:

pickling,

salting,

smoking,

preserving
in syrup
or alcohol,

sugar crystallisation

curing.




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SECTION 2



METHODS




PRESERVATION PROCESSES


Drying

Smoking

Freezing

Vacuum packing

Salt

Sugar

Pickling

Lye

Canning and bottling

Jellying

Jugging

Irradiation

Modified atmosphere

Burial in the ground

Controlled use of micro-organism

High pressure food preservation



FOOD PRESERVATION
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Food_preservation/



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SECTION 3



CAMMING




Canning is a method of preserving food by first sealing
it in air-tight jars, cans or pouches, and then heating
it to a temperature that destroys contaminating micro-
organisms that can either be of health or spoilage
concern because of the danger posed by several spore-
forming thermo-resistant microorganisms, such as
Clostridium botulinum (the causative agent of botulism).

Spores of C.Botulinum (in a concentration of 104 /ml)
can resist boiling at 100C (212F) for more than 300
minutes; however, as temperature increases the times
decrease exponentially, so at 121C (250F) for the
same concentration just 2.8 minutes are required.

From a public safety point of view, foods with low
acidity, i.e., pH > 4.3 need sterilization by canning
under conditions of both high temperature (116-130C)
and pressure.



Foods that must be
pressure canned
include most:

vegetables,

meats,

seafood,

poultry,

dairy products.


The only foods that may be safely canned in a boiling
water bath (without high pressure) are highly acidic
foods with a pH below 4.6[1], such as fruits, pickled
vegetables, or other foods to which acid has been added.



CANNING
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canning/



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SECTION 4



PRESERVES




The term Preserves is usually
interchangeable with Jam,
however some cookbooks define
Preserves as cooked and gelled
whole fruit (or vegetable),
which includes a significant
portion of the fruit.



PRESERVES
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit_preserves/



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SECTION 5



FRUIT
PRESERVES




Fruit preserves refers to fruit,
or vegetables, that have been
prepared, canned or jarred for
long term storage.

The preparation of fruit preserves
traditionally involves the use of
pectin.

There are various types of fruit
preserves made globally, and they
can be made from sweet or savory
ingredients.




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SECTION 6



JAM




Jam contains both fruit juice and
pieces of the fruit's/vegetable's
flesh[, however some cookbooks
define Jam as cooked and gelled
fruit (or vegetable) purees.

Properly, the term jam refers to
a product made with whole fruit,
cut into pieces or crushed.

The fruit is heated with water
and sugar to activate the pectin
in the fruit. The mixture is then
put into containers.




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SECTION 7



JELLY




In the US and Canada, the term jelly
refers to a type of clear fruit spread
consisting of firmed fruit (or vegetable)
juice made with pectin.

In British English, these products are
commonly referred to by the terms fruit
spread or preserves, although jelly is
also used in some instances, for example
mint jelly.

Jelly can be made from sweet, savory or
hot ingredients. Jelly is made by a
similar process to jam, with the
additional step of filtering out the
fruit pulp after the initial heating.

A cloth "jelly bag" is traditionally
used as a filter.




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SECTION 8



MARMALADE




Marmalade is a sweet preserve, traditionally with
a bitter tang, made from citrus fruit rind (most
popularly oranges), sugar, water, and (in some
commercial brands) a gelling agent.

The traditional British "marmalade" is most
commonly from Seville oranges, which are less
sweet than dessert oranges. American-style
marmalade is sweet and not bitter.



Marmalade is a fruit preserve, in English usage
made of citrus fruits. British-style marmalade
is sweet marmalade with a bitter tang made from
fruit, sugar, water, and zest, which contains
the bitter orange oil. Some commercial brands
add a gelling agent).

American-style marmalade is sweet, not bitter.
In English-speaking usage "marmalade" mostly
refers to a preserve derived from a citrus
fruit, commonly oranges. The recipe includes
sliced or chopped fruit peel simmered in fruit
juice and water until soft; indeed marmalade
is sometimes described as jam with fruit peel
(although manufacturers also produce peel-free
marmalade).

Marmalade can be made from lemons, limes,
grapefruits, strawberries or a combination.



MARMALADE
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marmalade



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SECTION 8A



JELLY
JAM
MARMALADE
LINKS




Divine Recipes
http://www.divinerecipes.com/recipes.cfm/cid/25/jam-jelly-recipes

Jelly Recipes
http://www.countryliving.com/recipefinder/best-recipes/jelly-recipes/

Homemade Jam and Jelly Recipes Blog
http://www.blogcatalog.com/blogs/homemade-jam-and-jelly-recipes.html

Homemade Jelly and Jam
http://www.geocities.com/green_cache/jelly_recipes.html

Homemade Jam and Jelly Recipes
http://www.jellyjamrecipes.com/

How to make Jam
http://www.pickyourown.org/jam.htm

How to Make Orange Marmalade
http://www.pickyourown.org/marmalade.php

How to Make Orange Marmalade
eHow.com

http://www.ehow.com/how_17984_make-orange-marmalade.html



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How To Make Seville
Orange Marmalade Recipe

http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-make-seville-orange-marmalade

jam recipes jelly recipes
http://www.razzledazzlerecipes.com/flavorsoffall/canning.htm

Jellies and Jam recipes
http://www.recipeland.com/category/view/?cid=342

Making orange marmalade
http://www.ochef.com/307.htm

Marmalade
http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/mostof_marmalade.shtml

National Center
for Home Food Preservation

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can7_jam_jelly.html

Orange Marmalade
http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,orange_marmalade,FF.html

Orange Marmalade Recipe
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/orange-marmalade-recipe/index.html



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Paula's Pepper Jelly Recipes
http://www.paulaspepperjelly.com/ppj_recipes.php

Pepperfool.com Jam
& Jelly Recipes Recipes

http://www.pepperfool.com/recipes/jams_idx.html

Recipes - Jam Jelly
http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,jam_jelly,FF.html

Rhubarb Jam Recipes
http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/recipe-jam.html



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SECTION 9



SYRUP




In cooking, a syrup is a thick, viscous liquid,
containing a large amount of dissolved sugars,
but showing little tendency to deposit crystals.

The viscosity arises from the multiple hydrogen
bonds between the dissolved sugar, which has
many hydroxyl (OH) groups, and the water.

Technically and scientifically, the term syrup
is also employed to denote viscous, generally
residual, liquids, containing substances other
than sugars in solution. Artificial maple
syrup is made with water and an extremely
large amount of dissolved sugar.

The solution is heated so more sugar can be
put in than normally possible. The solution
becomes super-saturated.



SYRUP
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrup/



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SECTION 10



FOOD
DEHYDRATORS




A food dehydrator is a small electrical
appliance for drying foods indoors.

A food dehydrator has an electric element,
similar to a a hair dryer) for heat and a
fan and vents for air circulation.

Dehydrators are efficiently designed to
dry foods fast at 140F.



CANNING FOOD DEHYDRATORS
http://www.pickyourown.org/canningfooddehydrators.htm/



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SECTION 11



WATERMELON
RIND
PRESERVES




WATERMELON RIND PRESERVES


One and one-half quarts prepared watermelon rind

1 tablespoon ground ginger

4 tablespoons salt

4 cups sugar

2 quarts cold water

1/4 cup lemon juice

1 lemon, thinly sliced

7 cups water



To prepare watermelon rind - trim green skin
and pink flesh from thick watermelon rind;
cut into 1-inch pieces. Dissolve salt in
1 quart water and pour over rind.

Let stand 5 to 6 hours if salt is used.
Drain; rinse and drain again. Cover with
cold water and let stand 30 minutes.

Drain. Sprinkle ginger over rind; cover
with water and cook until fork-tender.

Drain. Combine sugar, lemon juice and
7 cups water.

Boil 5 minutes; . add rind and boil
gently for 30 minutes.

Add sliced lemon and cook until the
melon rind is clear.

Pack, boiling hot, into hot Ball jars,
leaving 1/4 inch head space.

Adjust caps. Process half pints
and pints 20 minutes at 180 - 250
degrees F in hot water bath.



Yield: about 6 half pints


RECIPES WATERMELON
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/recipes/watermelon.html/



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SECTION 12



APPLE
SAUCE




Apple sauce (or applesauce) is a pure
made from apples, which are usually
cooked. It can use peeled or unpeeled
apples and a variety of spices or
additives such as cinnamon or sugar.

Apple sauce can be fine or coarse
textured, and may include large
chunks of apple.

Commercial versions of apple sauce
are readily available in supermarket
stores as a common food.

It may be packaged in glass jars,
aluminum cans, plastic or any
ceramic material.



Apple Sauce
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_sauce


Applesauce
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Applesauce


Applesauce Recipes
http://recipes.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Applesauce_Recipes



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SECTION 12A



APPLE
SAUCE
LINKS




Apple-Sauce.com
http://www.apple-sauce.com/

Applesauce: How to make homemade applesauce
http://www.pickyourown.org/applesauce.htm

Applesauce Cake Recipe
http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/29/Applesauce_Cake43085.shtml

Cooks.com - Recipes - Homemade Applesauce
http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,homemade_applesauce,FF.html

Just Slow Cooking Recipes
http://www.justslowcooking.com/inxaps.html

Recipes with "Applesauce"
http://www.americanprofile.com/recipes/term/applesauce.html

Traditional Apple Sauce Recipe
http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/7253/traditional+apple+sauce



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SECTION 13



APPLE
BUTTER




Apple butter is essentially a thicker and spicier
version of applesauce, traditionally made by
slow-cooking sliced or pureed apples in copper
kettles for up to 12 hours or more.

The apples are constantly stirred with long paddles.
The heat causes the fruit's natural sugars to
caramelize, thus giving apple butter its distinctive
deep brown color.

Apple butter is also known for its spicy flavor,
which comes from the addition of traditional
apple pie spices such as nutmeg, cloves and
especially cinnamon.

Commercially produced apple butter is generally
available in grocery stores, but the traditional
homemade apple butter is usually canned in jars
for personal consumption or sold at local farmers'
markets, craft shows and festivals.



WHAT IS APPLE-BUTTER
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-apple-butter.htm/



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SECTION 13A



APPLE
BUTTER
LINKS




Apple Butter Recipe
http://www.elise.com/recipes/archives/000119apple_butter.php

Apple Butter Recipe:
RecipeTips.com

http://www.recipetips.com/recipe-cards/t--1953/apple-butter.asp

apple butter and Recipes
Recipezaar

http://www.recipezaar.com/recipes.php?foodido=5361&title=apple%20butter

Ginger-apple Butter Recipe
http://www.grouprecipes.com/21573/ginger-apple-butter.html

How to make apple butter
http://www.pickyourown.org/applebutter.htm

Just Slow Cooking Recipes
Apple Butter recipes

http://www.justslowcooking.com/inxapb.html

Roasted Apple Butter Recipe
http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/roasted-apple-butter



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SECTION 14



PICKLING




Pickling, also known as brining or corning, is the
process of preserving food by anaerobic fermentation
in brine (a solution of salt in water) to produce
lactic acid, or marinating and storing it in an acid
solution, usually vinegar (acetic acid).

The resulting food is called a pickle. This procedure
gives the food a salty or sour taste. In South Asia
edible oils are used as the pickling medium instead
of vinegar.

The distinguishing feature is a pH less than 4.6,
which is sufficient to kill most bacteria. Pickling
can preserve perishable foods for months.

Antimicrobial herbs and spices, such as mustard,
garlic, cinnamon or cloves, are often added. If the
food contains sufficient moisture, a pickling brine
may be produced simply by adding dry salt. For example,
sauerkraut and Korean kimchi are produced by salting
the vegetables to draw out excess water.

Natural fermentation at room temperature, by lactic
acid bacteria, produces the required acidity. Other
pickles are made by placing vegetables in vinegar.

Unlike the canning process, pickling (which includes
fermentation) does not require that the food be
completely sterile before it is sealed.



Pickling
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickling



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SECTION 14A



PICKLING
LINKS




How to make pickled eggs
http://www.helpwithcooking.com/egg-guide/make-pickled-eggs.html

How To Pickle
http://www.howtopickle.com/

National Center for Home Food Preservation
http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can6b_pickle.html

Pickling chile peppers
http://www.g6csy.net/chile/pickling.html

Pickles & Pickling
http://www.foodreference.com/html/artpickles.html

Science of Pickles
http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/pickles/tips.html



Brining
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brining

Indian pickle
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_pickle

Mixed pickle
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixed_pickle

Pickled cucumber
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickled_cucumber

Pickled egg
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickled_egg

Pickling salt
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickling_salt
Pickled snakes
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickled_snakes



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SECTION 15



CRANBERRY




Cranberry, Health, Research,
Antioxidant, Phytonutrient,
Nutrition, Medical, Growers,
Fruit, Agriculture, bog, grow.




Cranberries are a group of evergreen dwarf shrubs
or trailing vines in the genus Vaccinium subgenus
Oxycoccos, or in some treatments, in the distinct
genus Oxycoccos.

They are found in acidic bogs throughout the cooler
parts of the Northern Hemisphere.

Cranberries are low, creeping shrubs or vines up
to 2 m long and 5 to 20 cm in height;[1] they have
slender, wiry stems that are not thickly woody and
have small evergreen leaves.

The flowers are dark pink, with very distinct
reflexed petals, leaving the style and stamens
fully exposed and pointing forward.

They are pollinated by domestic honey bees. The
fruit is an epigynous berry that is larger than
the leaves of the plant; it is initially white,
but turns a deep red when fully ripe.

It is edible, with an acidic taste that can
overwhelm its sweetness.



CRANBERRY
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cranberry



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SECTION 15A



CRANBERRY
LINKS




The American Cranberry
http://www.library.wisc.edu/guides/agnic/cranberry/

Americran.com
http://www.americran.com/

Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' Association
http://www.cranberries.org/

CRANBERRIES
http://www.cranberries.org/

Cranberry Institute
http://www.cranberryinstitute.org/

HortResearch
http://www.hortresearch.co.nz/

U.S. Department of Agriculture
http://www.nal.usda.gov/

Wisconsin State Cranberry Growers Association:
http://www.wiscran.org/



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SECTION 16



CANNING
LINKS




AMERICAS TEST KITCHEN
http://www.americastestkitchen.com/

Aseptic filling fundamentals
http://www.hrs-spiratube.com/en/resources/aseptic_filling_fundamentals.aspx/

Assorted Jam and Jelly recipes
http://www.jam-recipes.co.uk/

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS
http://www.BetterHomesandGardens.com

Canning and Preserving Recipes
http://www.recipelink.com/rcpjam.html/

CD KITCHEN
http://www.cdkitchen.com/

Cooks.com
http://www.cooks.com/

CULINARY CAFE
http://www.culinarycafe.com/

Divine Recipes
http://www.divinerecipes.com/



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Epicurious.com
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/

Food Reference
http://www.foodreference.com/

A Fork in the Trail.com
http://www.aforkinthetrail.com/

History of glass manufacturing
http://www.bsu.edu/library/

The history of the Norwegian
Canning Industry

http://www.stavanger.museum.no/Eng/Hermetikk/hermhist.htm/

Homecanning.com
http://www.homecanning.com/

Homemade Jam and Jelly Recipes
http://www.jellyjamrecipes.com/

HOW TO MAKE HOMEMADE JAM
http://www.pickyourown.org/jam.htm



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iChef
http://www.ichef.com/

www.ichef.com/HOME CANNING
http://www.homecanning.com/

International Jelly
and Preserve Association

http://www.jelly.org/

Just Slow Cooking Recipes
Apple Butter recipes

http://www.justslowcooking.com/inxapb.html

Karo Syrup
http://www.karosyrup.com/

Making Jams and Jellies
http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can7_jam_jelly.html/

Making Jams, Marmalades,
Preserves, and Conserves

http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/nutrition/DJ1088.html/



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My Recipes.com
http://www.myrecipes.com

National Center for Home Food Preservation
http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html/

Preserve Food.com
http://www.preservefood.com/canning/recipea.shtml

Recipe Tips.com
http://www.recipetips.com/recipe-cards/

Recipezaar
http://www.recipezaar.com/

WISE GEEK
http://www.wisegeek.com/



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SECTION 17



FOOD
PRESERVATION
RESOURCES




Home canning
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_canning

Drying (food)
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drying_(food) Drying (food)

Fermentation (food
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermentation_(food)

Smoking (food)
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoking_(food)

Sugaring (food)
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugaring

Succade
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Succade

Fruit preserves
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit_preserves

Zest
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zest



Introduction on Canning Fruits and Vegetables
http://farmgal.tripod.com/index-2.html

How to Can Vegetables Using a Pressure Canner
http://farmgal.tripod.com/PressureCannerVegetables.html

How to Can Vegetables Using a Boiling Water Canner
http://farmgal.tripod.com/CanningBoilingWaterCanner.html

How to Can Fruit
http://farmgal.tripod.com/CanningFruit.html

How to Freeze Fruits and Vegetables from Your Garden
http://farmgal.tripod.com/Freezerbasics.html

How to Make Jams and Jellies
http://farmgal.tripod.com/Jamsjellies.html

How to Make Pickles and Relish
http://farmgal.tripod.com/PicklesRelish.html

How to Dehydrate Fruits and Vegetables from Your Garden
http://farmgal.tripod.com/Dehydrate.html

How to Make lye Soap and Other Homemade Concoctions
http://farmgal.tripod.com/lyesoapconcoctions.html

Home Processing Troubleshooting Guide
http://farmgal.tripod.com/troubleshooting.html

Home Canning Links
http://farmgal.tripod.com/canninglinks.html



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