BUTTERFLY
BUTTERFLIES




BUTTERFLY

BUTTERFLY GARDENING

HOW TO CREATE A BUTTERFLY GARDEN

BUTTERFLY LIFE CYCLE

BUTTERFLY AND MOTHS

BUTTERFLY AND MOTHS RELATED TOPICS

BUTTERFLY LINKS



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SECTION 1



BUTTERFLY




A butterfly is a mainly day-flying insect of the order Lepidoptera,
which includes the butterflies and moths. Like other holometabolous
insects, the butterfly's life cycle consists of four parts: egg,
larva, pupa and adult. Most species are diurnal.

Butterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, and conspicuous,
fluttering flight. Butterflies comprise the true butterflies (superfamily
Papilionoidea), the skippers (superfamily Hesperioidea) and the
moth-butterflies (superfamily Hedyloidea). All the many other families
within the Lepidoptera are referred to as moths. The earliest known
butterfly fossils date to the mid Eocene epoch, between 40-50 million
years ago.



Habits

Butterflies feed primarily on nectar from flowers. Some also derive nourishment
from pollen, tree sap, rotting fruit, dung, decaying flesh, and dissolved
minerals in wet sand or dirt. Butterflies are important as pollinators for some
species of plants although in general they do not carry as much pollen load as
bees. They are however capable of moving pollen over greater distances. Flower
constancy has been observed for at least one species of butterfly.



Butterfly
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly



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SECTION 2



BUTTERFLY
GARDENING




Butterfly gardening is a growing school of gardening, specifically wildlife
gardening, that is aimed at creating an environment that attracts butterflies,
as well as certain moths, such as those in the Hemaris genus. Butterfly
gardening is often aimed at inviting those butterflies and moths to lay eggs
as well.

Because some plants are not fed upon by adult butterflies, the caterpillar host
should also be planted for a bigger population of butterflies. Butterflies
typically feed on the nectar of flowers, and there are hundreds of such plants
that may be planted to attract them, depending on the location, time of year,
and other factors. In addition to the planting of flowers that feed butterflies,
other means of attracting them include constructing ¨butterfly houses¨, providing
sand for puddling, water, and other resources or food items, including rotten fruit.



Butterfly gardening
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly_gardening



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SECTION 3



HOW TO
CREATE A
BUTTERFLY GARDEN




Butterfly gardens can add a splash of color to your yard, while the
butterflies themselves are good for the local ecosystem. They are
crop and flower pollinators, who play an important role in the food
chain.

It takes a variety of flowers and shrubs that provide food for both
the adult and larval stages to create a butterfly garden. Fortunately,
all of the butterfly species in the United States and Canada have the
same basic life cycle, following the metamorphosis from an egg to an
adult butterfly. Some butterflies endure only one cycle a year, while
others may go through two or three generations in a season.

Every butterfly's life cycle requires food for both the adult and larval
stages. When planting a butterfly garden that is the most important thing
to remember.



Host plants

It's easy to plant a garden that you'll enjoy, while also making it attractive
to butterflies. Many of the nectar plants butterflies rely on have bright
colorful flowers. The host plants aren't as showy, but they are equally important.
A good balance of both will make your garden attractive and busy.

The first step is finding the right host plants for your garden. However, choosing
them requires knowledge of native butterflies in your region because caterpillars
can be picky eaters. Many restrict themselves to a single species of host plant or
a single group of closely related plants.

To get started, check out
 

Gardening for Butterflies
http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/wildlife/landscaping-for-wildlife/pa-wildlife-8


Nectar plants


Unlike caterpillars, adult butterflies are more flexible in their feeding needs. Generally,
they're attracted to purple, red, yellow, orange or pink blossoms; flat-topped or clustered
flowers; and short flower tubes. Along with an assortment of the previously listed qualities,
a well-planned garden provides a continuous food supply with blooming flowers throughout
spring, summer and early fall.


To provide a year-round supply of nectar, follow

Gardening for Butterflies
http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/wildlife/landscaping-for-wildlife/pa-wildlife-8

outline of nectar-producing plants that native butterflies of the region


Butterfly garden essentials

Selecting the right host and nectar plants for the native butterfly populations in your region
is the most important step; however, there are other factors to consider when planting your
garden.



Garden tips


Plant in clusters.

Once you've selected some host plants and nectar-producing varieties, plant them in clusters.
It's easier for butterflies to notice large groups of colors and shapes that are planted
together.



Chose common varieties.

Common varieties of flowers produce more nectar than hybrids. This is why it' often more
beneficial to choose them for your butterfly garden.



Plant your garden in the sun.

Flowering plants need sunlight to produce nectar, and butterflies need the sun to warm
their bodies for flight.



Don't use pesticides.

Insecticides kill butterflies, caterpillars and other beneficial insects. Herbicides can
eliminate sources of food for caterpillars and may ultimately kill them.



Provide some protection from the wind.

Storms and windy days can be hard on butterflies. Trellises, shrubs and short brick or
rock walls can provide shelter for butterflies to feed and lay eggs.



Create wet spots.

Male butterflies like to gather at wet sand patches and mud puddles.


Put out rotten fruit and stale beer.

A mixture of overripe fruit and stale beer is often effective to draw butterflies into
your garden.


Garden Plants
http://www.in.gov/dnr/entomolo/files/gardenplants.pdf


Indiana Department of Natural Resources suggests a concoction of mashed rotten bananas,
molasses, sugar, stale beer and fruit juices all mixed in water.



Give them a place to bask.

Butterflies are cold blooded and sometimes need a place to warm up. Placing a few rocks in
sunlight can give them a place to bask.



How to plant a hummingbird garden
https://www.farmanddairy.com/top-stories/how-to-plant-a-hummingbird-garden/414171.html



How to find and raise Monarch caterpillars
https://www.farmanddairy.com/top-stories/how-to-find-and-raise-monarch-caterpillars/436878.html




How to garden for pollinators
https://www.farmanddairy.com/top-stories/how-to-garden-for-pollinators/466535




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SECTION 4



BUTTERFLY
LIFE CYCLE




The butterfly life cycle consists of four different life stages:

egg,

caterpillar

pupa

adult or imago.

The differences between those life stages are incredible!



Butterfly life cycle stage 1: Egg

Egg butterfly life cycle - butterfly eggAll butterflies are oviparous.
Depending on the species, butterflies can lay a few hundred to many
thousands eggs. The shape of the eggs vary widely. The surface of the
egg can be smooth or it can have pits and grooves. A female butterfly
mostly lays her eggs on leaves or twigs. Depending on the temperature,
the embryo develops in 1-3 weeks to a caterpillar. The color of the
egg becomes darker as it matures.



Butterfly life cycle stage 2: Caterpillar

Caterpillar butterfly life cycle - caterpillarAs soon as the embryo has
developed into a caterpillar, it eats his way out of the egg. On the
outside, the caterpillar mostly eats leaves and plants. While the
caterpillars pass from the egg stage to the pupal stage, they typically
shed their skin and molt several times.



Butterfly life cycle stage 3: Pupa

Pupa butterfly life cycle - butterfly pupaDuring the caterpillar stage,
butterflies can travel long distances in search of an ideal place to
pupate. The insect undergoes lots of changes during this stage. Although
on the outside, there is almost no physical activity. Depending on
species and temperature, the pupal stage may last from a few weeks to
several months.



Butterfly life cycle stage 4: Adult

Adult butterfly life cycle - Butterfly Adult or ImagoThe adult stage is
the most known stage. The butterfly has its typical appearance: a hairy
caterpillar-like body with jointed legs and usually relatively large
wings. There are butterfly species that overwinter as adult and they can
potentially live up to eight months. But most of the butterflies generally
last only a few weeks.



Butterfly life cycle
http://www.butterflylifecycle.org/



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SECTION 5



BUTTERFLY
AND
MOTHS




Butterflies and Moths, members of an insect order characterized
by two pairs of large, scale-covered, membranous wings. Adults
are additionally characterized by a pair of well-developed
compound eyes, mouthparts consisting of a long, coiled, sucking
tube, or proboscis, and prominent antennae.

Approximately 148,000 species are known worldwide; by 1993,
11,286 had been described in North America. As a group of
animals, butterflies and moths are surpassed in diversity
only by the beetles.



Butterflies and Moths
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/




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SECTION 6



BUTTERFLY
AND
MOTHS
RELATED
TOPICS




More about Butterflies and Moths
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/more_butterflies_and_moths.shtml

Cabbage Butterfly
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/cabbage_butterfly/

Caterpillars
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/caterpillars/

Checkerspot
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/checkerspot/

Fritillary
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/fritillary/

Monarch Butterfly
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/monarch_butterfly/

Painted Lady
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/painted_lady/

Peacock Butterfly
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/peacock_butterfly/

Red Admiral
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/red_admiral/

Skipper
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/skipper/

Swallowtail
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/swallowtail/

Viceroy
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/butterflies_and_moths/viceroy/



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SECTION 7



BUTTERFLY
LINKS




All About Butterflies
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/butterfly/

Butterflies and Moths of North America
https://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/

Butterfly Flower Gardening
http://www.kremp.com/Butterfly-Flower-Gardening-articles.htm

Butterfly Garden
http://www.thebutterflysite.com/gardening.shtml

Butterfly Gardening
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org / visit / family-of-attractions / butterfly-house / butterflies-and-plants / butterfly-gardening.aspx

Butterfly Gardening
http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/dg6711.html

Butterfly Gardening
http://www.butterflygardening.org/

Butterfly Gardening Tips
http://www.in.gov/dnr/entomolo/files/gardenplants.pdf

Butterfly Garden Plans
http://www.butterfly--garden.com/

Butterfly Life Cycle
http://www.ansp.org/explore/online-exhibits/butterflies/lifecycle/

Butterfly Life Cycle
http://www.tooter4kids.com/LifeCycle/Butterfly_Life_Cycle.htm



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Butterfly Pavilion
http://www.butterflies.org/

Butterfly Pictures, Images
http://www.desicomments.com/desi/butterfly/

The Butterfly Site
http://www.thebutterflysite.com/

The Butterfly WebSite
http://butterflywebsite.com/

Butterfly World
http://www.butterflyworld.com/

Children's Butterfly Site
http://www.kidsbutterfly.org/

Gardening for Butterflies
http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/wildlife/landscaping-for-wildlife/pa-wildlife-8

How to create a butterfly garden
https://www.farmanddairy.com/top-stories/how-to-create-a-butterfly-garden/422532.html

How to Create a Butterfly and Hummingbird Garden
http://www.njaudubon.org/education/backyardhabitat/butterhummgarden.html

Learn About Butterflies
http://www.learnaboutbutterflies.com/index.htm



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The LIFE-CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/butterflies/lifecycle/

Life Cycle of Butterflies and Moths
http://www.kidsbutterfly.org/life-cycle

The Monarch Butterfly
http://www.kidzone.ws/animals/monarch_butterfly.htm

North American Butterflies and Moths
https://www.insectidentification.org/butterflies-and-moths.asp

North American Butterfly Association
http://www.naba.org/

Raise Live Butterfly Gardens
http://www.butterflygardenhabitat.com

Recommended Plants to Attract Hummingbirds, Butterflies,Moths,
http://www.njaudubon.org/education/backyardhabitat/Keyplants.html



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Animals and Their Habitats
http://www.dpughphoto.com/index




Critter Catalog
http://www.biokids.umich.edu/critters/




The Encyclopedia of Life
http://eol.org/




The Xerces Society
http://www.xerces.org/




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