BULLY
BULLYING




BULLYING

WARNING SIGNS

HOW TO STOP BULLYING

CYBERBULLYING

BULLYING LINKS

BULLYING RESOURCES



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SECTION 1



BULLYING




Bullying is abusive treatment, the use of force
or coercion to affect others, particularly when
habitual and involving an imbalance of power. It
may involve verbal harassment, physical assault
or coercion and may be directed persistently
towards particular victims, perhaps on grounds
of:


race,

religion,

sex

ability.



The "imbalance of power" may be social power
and/or physical power. The victim of bullying
is sometimes referred to as a "target."



Bullying consists of
three basic types of
abuse

emotional,

verbal

physical.



It typically involves subtle methods of coercion
such as intimidation. Bullying can be defined in
many different ways. Although the UK currently
has no legal definition of bullying, some U.S.
states have laws against it.

Bullying ranges from simple one-on-one bullying
to more complex bullying in which the bully may
have one or more 'lieutenants' who may seem to
be willing to assist the primary bully in his
bullying activities. Bullying in school and the
workplace is also referred to as peer abuse

Bullying can occur in any context in which human
beings interact with each other.



This includes:

school,

church,

family,

workplace,

home

neighborhoods.



It is even a common push factor in migration.
Bullying can exist between social groups,
social classes and even between countries.



BULLYING
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullying



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SECTION 2



WARNING
SIGNS




There are many warning signs that could indicate
that someone is involved in bullying, either by
bullying others or by being bullied. However,
these warning signs may indicate other issues
or problems, as well.

If you are a parent or educator, learn more
about talking to someone about bullying.




Being Bullied


Comes home with damaged or missing clothing
or other belongings

Reports losing items such as books, electronics,
clothing, or jewelry

Has unexplained injuries

Complains frequently of headaches, stomachaches,
or feeling sick

Has trouble sleeping or has frequent bad dreams

Has changes in eating habits

Hurts themselves

Are very hungry after school from not eating
their lunch

Runs away from home

Loses interest in visiting or talking
with friends

Is afraid of going to school or other
activities with peers

Loses interest in school work or begins
to do poorly in school

Appears sad, moody, angry, anxious or
depressed when they come home

Talks about suicide

Feels helpless

Often feels like they are not good enough

Blames themselves for their problems

Suddenly has fewer friends

Avoids certain places

Acts differently than usual




Bullying Others


Becomes violent with others

Gets into physical or verbal fights
with others

Gets sent to the principalís office or
detention a lot

Has extra money or new belongings that
cannot be explained

Is quick to blame others

Will not accept responsibility for
their actions

Has friends who bully others

Needs to win or be best at everything



Stop Bullying.gov
http://www.stopbullying.gov/



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SECTION 3



HOW
TO
STOP
BULLYING




Whether or not you have been bullied,
there are things you can do to stop
bullying.

The first thing you should do is to tell a
teacher, nurse, or other trusted adult at
your school if bullying happens at your
school. This may seem like tattling, but
itís not. The victim of a bully is someone
you can protect. By telling someone at
school about bullying, you are protecting
the victim the same as if you stood up to
a bully yourself.




If you see someone being bulliedÖ



Although you may not be directly involved in
the bullying, there may be times when you see
others being bullied. And even though it may
be easier to stand by and watch or ignore the
bullying, try to keep in mind, we all need a
little help from time to time.

Think about how you might feel if the bullying
was happening to you. Hereís how you can make
a difference:



Stand up for the victim.

It takes a lot of courage, but try defending
the person being bullied. This can shock and
embarrass the bully so much that they leave
their victim alone.



Donít join in on bullying.

If you see someone being bullied, donít join in.
If the bully tries to get you to help, refuse
and walk away.



Stop the rumors.

Donít help spread rumors about another person.
You wouldnít want rumors spread about you, so
donít do it to someone else! If someone gossips
to you, let it end with you Ė donít pass it on
to others. You can even tell that person youíre
not interested.



Tell an adult.

Donít just stand there and watch, especially
if someone is being hurt physically. Tell an
adult about the bully and whatís going on.
If you feel uncomfortable or unsafe telling
an adult, ask the adult to keep your comments
private.



Offer help.

When the bully is gone, try and help the person
who was bullied and make sure he or she is okay.
Encourage her to talk to an adult and stick up
for herself.

When you help someone whoís being bullied, you
are not just helping someone else, youíre also
helping yourself. Itís important to stand up
for what you believe in and help others when
you can.




If you see someone being bullied
http://www.girlshealth.gov/bullying/stopping/seeing.cfm


If you are bullied
http://www.girlshealth.gov/bullying/stopping/beingbullied.cfm


Keep from being bullied
http://www.girlshealth.gov/bullying/stopping/prevent.cfm


Stop bullying at your school
http://www.girlshealth.gov/bullying/stopping/school.cfm


Hazing
http://www.girlshealth.gov/bullying/hazing/index.cfm


How to stop a bully
http://www.girlshealth.gov/bullying/stopping/index.cfm



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10
WAYS
TO
STOP
BULLING




There are ten ways
to stop a bully.



1. Put on a brave face.

When you let a bully know that you are
afraid of them, it is like giving them
power. If you give them some power, you
will find that the bullying gets worse.
So, put on a brave face, and never show
your fear.



2. Have a friend around.

Bullies are reluctant to go after someone
who has backup. Bullies usually pick out
the weakest person they can find, and
there is strength in numbers. So, stop a
bully by having a friend on hand all the
time.



3. Avoid the bully.

There are some situations where bullying
is worse because it is an ideal situation
for a bully to go after their victim without
any consequences. If there is no adult around,
no authority figure like a teacher or parent,
then they can bully without fear of getting
caught. So, avoid these situations. On the
playground stay where other kids can hear,
where the playground monitor is around, etc.



4. Ignore bullies.

A lot of what bullies do is for a reaction.
They say or do things to see what you will
do. If you want to stop a bully, just ignore
their efforts, soon they will find someone
else. Whether it is bullying online or in
person, ignore, ignore, ignore.



5. Confront the bully.

One of the things that you should do is
confront the bully. Ask them why they are
bullying you. Ask them what the problem
is. Ask them to stop. Bullies are rarely
asked to face the reality that they are
being a bully, so make them face it.



6. Report the bullying.

Bullies can't bully for long if they are
getting caught. The beginning of getting
a bully to stop has to start with an
authority figure. So, each time someone
bullies you, tell an adult. If it happens
at school, tell a counselor, a teacher,
or the principal.



7. Improve your self-esteem.

Bullies usually pick on kids who have low
esteem. They look for people who are weak,
isolated, that feel alone, and have few
friends. There is less chance of them
being caught that way. Work on your esteem,
and you won't be picked on long.



8. Control your feelings.

As mentioned previously, bullies look for
reactions, don't give them one, and soon
they will grow bored and move on.



9. Stand up for yourself
when it gets bad.


If a bully is physically harming you,
ruining your reputation, or something
else then don't put up with it. Instead,
say the words like, "Stop" or "Don't"
and make sure they know you are done
taking their bullying.



10. Don't bully back.

It is good to say no, but don't bully
in return. You don't want to be on the
same level. Instead, tell someone that
they are bullying you, and then do your
best to ignore.



10 Ways to Stop A Bully
http://www.surfnetparents.com/10_ways_to_stop_a_bully-21098.html



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HOW
TO
STOP
A
BULLY




Bullying as, ďWhen someone repeatedly and on
purpose says or does mean things to another
person who has a hard time defending herself
or herself.Ē


These hurtful things can take on
many forms, including:


Name calling and verbal harassment

Leaving another person out of a group

Physical bullying such as pushing,
hitting or kicking

Taking away money or damaging personal
property

Threatening or forcing another person
to do things they donít want to do

Racial bullying

Sexual bullying

Cyber-bullying (text messaging or
the Internet)




Here are eight simple
steps you can take
right now to stop a
bully:



1. Take it seriously.

When a bullyís tactics cross the line, take
the actions seriously. Typical warning signs
include withdrawal, unexplained injuries, or
becoming afraid to go to work or school. If
the bullying is happening to someone close
to you, address these signs with the person
as soon as you notice them. If you are the
victim, find someone to talk with about what
is happening. Left ignored, the bullying will
likely escalate.



2. Use your voice.

Workplace and schoolhouse bullies would prefer
to keep their actions under the radar so they
may continue. However, one of the most effective
ways to stop bullying is to report the bullyís
actions to others. Be specific so the person
receiving the information understands what is
occurring and its impact on you or the victim.



3. Donít bully back.

This is a no-win deal. Often times, the bully
is looking for an aggressive response so they
can increase their bullying Ė perhaps with
even more force and violence. As stated before,
the best bet is to alert others to what is
happening.



4. Provide consequences.

Adults who are being bullied can enforce some
boundaries. For example, if you find yourself
being bullied by a co-worker, or even a
supervisor, tell the bully if the behavior
doesnít stop then you will report him or her
to the human resources department.



5. Donít take it personally.

What motivates a bully is usually an issue or
a limitation the bully feels insecure with.
Bullies target others to feel better about
themselves. Even though being on the
receiving-end of a bullyís wrath is
unpleasant, as well as unsafe, remember itís
not about you; of anything you did wrong.
When helping another person through their
experience with a bully, remind them of their
worth and value and to ignore the harsh name
calling being fired at them.



6. Move past the shame.

Bullies will think they can continue the
bullying because their victim may be too
ashamed to say anything. When I was a child,
the bullies taunted me about my speech
impediment and the fact I had to wear
eyeglasses Ė two things that brought me
shame regardless if I was being bullied,
or not. The bullying only exacerbated my
shame. Now as an adult, I know the
playground bullies from my past were
motivated by their own shame. If you are
a victim, understand the internalized
guilt you feel belongs to the person
bullying you. Give the shame back to the
bully. When you do, you will begin to
feel the power you do have.



7. Look for trends.

Bullies have patterns. At work, if you
notice your boss is more aggressive just
before an important meeting, then avoid
these meetings, or least your interactions
with your boss beforehand. If your child
reports the bully is more hostile on the
school bus, then consider alternative ways
to get your child to school. Bullies adopt
habits and trends. Becoming more aware of
these trends, and then developing a plan
to counter them, will put you in a better
position to stop the bullying.



8. Use common sense when online.

Guard your passwords and the passwords of
your children. Be discerning when considering
if your elementary or middle school-aged
child may create Facebook or email accounts.
Limit social media friend requests and other
contacts to only those people with whom you
have positive relationship with offline.
Watch the amount of time your child is
spending online and monitor their emotions
and behaviors afterwards.



How to Stop a Bully
http://www.thebridgemaker.com/how-to-stop-a-bully/



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10
WAYS
TO
STOP
BULLYING




Bullying affects every aspect of your life.
Bullies make you feel hurt, scared and lonely,
and can even affect your schoolwork. According
to The Nation's Health in 2010, studies show
that around 15 to 25 percent of kids are being
bullied on a regular basis, so you are not
alone. It is a big problem that shouldn't be
ignored. Take simple steps to deal with bullies
in order to make them stop.




Tell Someone

Telling someone about the bullying is the most
important step in stopping it. Tell your parents,
your teacher or a school counselor. You should
not have to deal with the bully alone, especially
since he could become violent.



Avoidance

Avoid the bully. You still need to carry on with
your normal routine, such as attending school, but
avoid situations where the bully typically picks
on you. Say, for instance, the bully usually
bothers you on your way home from school. Try to
take a different route home and avoid him.



Be Brave

Acting brave can sometimes stop a bully. When you
give an outward appearance of calm and don't back
down, the bully can see that you know how to stand
up for yourself.



Don't Fight Back

Fighting back only gives the bully what he is
looking for -- your reaction. In addition, a
violent reaction could get you in serious
trouble. Stand your ground, but do not be
antagonistic.



Find a Friend

Stick with a friend whenever you think you
might run into the bully. He's less likely
to lash out at you when you have a someone
by your side.



Don't Be Emotional

Don't let your feelings or emotions show.
If the bully makes you want to cry, don't
cry in front of him; this gives him the
satisfaction that he's hurt your feelings.
Wait until you're away from the incident
and with someone you trust to show your
feelings.



Self-Confidence

Feel good about yourself. Self-confidence
often stops bullies in their tracks and
helps keep you from being a potential
target. Do whatever makes you feel good,
like joining an after-school sport or an
art club.



Walk Away

Walk away from the bully when he approaches
you. Walking away takes a lot of confidence
and this alone may deter a bully's attacks.
Plus, by walking away, you're telling the
bully you don't care about him or his
actions.



Remove the Triggers

Take away whatever triggers the bully's
actions. For instance, if the bully
demands your lunch money every day,
start bringing your lunch instead.
Figure out what instigates the
bullying and avoid it.



Be a Friend

If you see another kid being bullied,
stick up for him. A show of support
emphasizes to a bully that his behavior
won't be tolerated by his peers. Also,
you will gain a friend in the process
a friend who will most likely help you
out if you're in the same position.



10 Ways to Stop Bullying
http://www.ehow.com/list_7480896_10-ways-stop-bullying.html



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SECTION 4



CYBERBULLYING




Cyberbullying is the term used for the new,
and growing, practice of using technology



internet,

interactive

digital technologies

mobile phones

to harass, or bully,
someone else.



Bullies used to be restricted to methods
such as physical intimidation, postal mail,
or the telephone. Now, developments in
electronic media offer forums such as
email, instant messaging, web pages, and
digital photos to add to the arsenal.
Computers, cell phones, and PDAs are new
tools that can be applied to an old
practice.

Forms of cyberbullying can range in severity
from cruel or embarrassing rumors to threats,
harassment, or stalking. It can affect any
age group; however, teenagers and young
adults are common victims, and cyberbullying
is a growing problem in schools. Many cases
of Cyber Bullying have lead to youth suicide.

There are two kinds of cyberbullying, direct
attacks (messages sent to your kids directly)
and cyberbullying by proxy (using others to
help cyberbully the victim, either with or
without the accomplice's knowledge). Because
cyberbullying by proxy often gets adults
involved in the harassment, it is much more
dangerous.



Direct Attacks


1.Instant Messaging/Text
Messaging Harassment

2.Stealing Passwords

3.Blogs

4.Web Sites

5.Sending Pictures through
E-mail and Cell Phones

6.Internet Polling

7.Interactive Gaming

8.Sending Malicious Code

9.Sending Porn and Other
Junk E-Mail and IMs

10.Impersonation




Cyberbullying by proxy


Cyberbullying by proxy is when a cyberbully
gets someone else to do their dirty work.
Most of the time they are unwitting
accomplices and don't know that they are
being used by the cyberbully. Cyberbullying
by proxy is the most dangerous kind of
cyberbullying because it often gets adults
involve in the harassment and people who
don't know they are.

The most typical way a cyberbullying by
proxy attack occurs is when the cyberbully
gets control of the victim's account and
sends out hateful or rude messages to
everyone on their buddy list pretending
to be the victim. They may also change
the victim's password so they can't get
into their own account. The victim's
friends get angry with the victim,
thinking they had sent the messages
without knowing they have been used
by the cyberbully. But it's not always
this minor. Sometimes the cyberbully
tries to get more people involved.



cyberbullying
http://www.how-to-stop-bullying.com/cyberbullying.html



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SECTION 5



BULLYING
LINKS




10 Ways to Stop Bullying
http://www.ehow.com/list_7480896_10-ways-stop-bullying.html

Bullying
http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/facts_for_families/bullying

Bullying Awareness & Prevention Guide
http://www.learnpsychology.org/now/bullying/

Bullying in Boys and Girls
http://www.webmd.com/parenting/tc/bullying-topic-overview

Bully Prevention
http://www.parentinged.com/bullying/

Bullying in schools
http://www.dfes.gov.uk/bullying

Bullying. No Way!
http://www.bullyingnoway.com.au/

Bullying Prevention and Awareness Guidebook
http://www.learnpsychology.org/now/bullying/

Cyberbullying
http://www.how-to-stop-bullying.com/cyberbullying.html

How to stop a bully
http://www.girlshealth.gov/bullying/stopping/index.cfm


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How To Stop Bullying
http://www.ihatebullies.net/

How to stop bullying
http://www.totalbullysolution.com/

How to Stop Bullying in School
http://www.crime-safety-security.com/Stop-Bullying.html

How To Stop Bullying
http://www.angermanagementresource.com/bullying.html

How to Stop Bullying in the Workplace
http://www.workingmother.com/workplace/how-stop-bullying-workplace

National Stop Bullying Day
http://www.heyugly.org/NationalStopBullyingDay.php

Prevent Bullying
http://www.bullyingstatistics.org/content/prevent-bullying.html

STOP cyberbullying
http://www.stopcyberbullying.org/


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Stop the Bully
http://www.mcgruff.org/Games/stop_bully.php

Stop Bullying.gov
http://www.stopbullying.gov/

Stop Bullying Now!
http://www.stopbullyingnow.com/

Stop Bullying NOW!
http://www.mommymatter.com/stop-bullying-now/

Stop Bullying: Speak Up
http://www.cartoonnetwork.com/promos/stopbullying/index.html

Understanding Cyberbullying in College
http://www.affordablecollegesonline.org/college-resource-center/cyberbullying-awareness/

What Parents can do to Stop Bullying!
http://www.jaredstory.com/bullying_whattodo.html

Workplace Bully
http://www.how-to-stop-bullying.com/workplacebullying.html



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SECTION 6



BULLYING
RESOURCES




Complex post-traumatic stress disorder
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_post-traumatic_stress_disorder


Hazing
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hazing


Mobbing
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobbing


Passive aggression
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passive_aggression


Psychological manipulation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_manipulation


Psychological trauma
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_trauma


Relational aggression
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_aggression


Scapegoating
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scapegoating


School violence
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_violence


Social undermining
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_undermining


Taunting
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taunting


Teasing
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teasing


Victim blaming
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victim_blaming


Victim playing
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victim_playing


Victimisation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victimisation



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