AFRICAN BLACK SOAP
ANAGO SOAP
ALATA SIMENA
OSE DUDU




WHAT IS BLACK SOAP?

HOW TO MAKE BLACK SOAP

HOW TO MAKE LIQUID BLACK AFRICAN SOAP

AFRICAN BLACK SOAP RELATED TOPICS

AFRICAN BLACK SOAP LINKS



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SECTION 1



WHAT IS
BLACK SOAP?




Black Soap, also known as African Black Soap (Anago Soap, Alata Simena,
or Ose Dudu), has long been used to heal problem skin. Its good for
thinning fine lines, evening out dark spots, eczema, razor bumps and
eliminating blemishes. It is also used to lightly exfoliate and give you
healthier looking skin. The soap can also be used on your body or hair
or for oily skin, dry skin, skin rashes, scalp irritations, body odors
and is good for sensitive skin.

Black soap is made from the ash of locally harvested plants and barks
such a plantain, cocoa pods, palm tree leaves, and shea tree bark. First
the leaves and bark are sun-dried and then roasted in a kettle or pot at
an even, constant temperature, which is important to ensure color, texture
and smell. Then water and various oils - palm oil, coconut oil, palm
oil (including shea butter and cocoa pod powder) - are added to
the mixture and stirred for at least a day. After that, the "soap" is left
to set for two weeks to cure. Oftentimes the soap is made by women and is
fair-traded, though not always.

Black soap is traditionally made in west Africa, typically Ghana, from
secret recipes. Different tribes and communities have adopted their own
specific (secret) blend of oils and cooking techniques, which can be seen
in the different color variations among black soap. The ash itself was
often used to heal cuts. Varieties of black soap actually made in Africa
tend to be pure, while soaps made in Europe or the US tend to have added
artificial ingredients.



What is Black Soap?
http://www.treehugger.com/style/what-is-black-soap.html



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SECTION 2



HOW TO MAKE
BLACK SOAP




Black soap is a handmade soap, known for being gentle and alleviating
skin ailments, that has been used for centuries throughout Western
Africa. It consists of a naturally-derived emollient combined with the
nutrient-rich ashes of native African plant materials. It is used on
the face, body and hair. Currently, some artisans who make black soap
deviate from the original African recipe by replacing plantain ashes
with more accessible cocoa ashes, as well as by adding essential oils,
herbs or dried flowers. By following these steps, you can create your
own black soap at home.



Things You'll Need

Base oil (palm oil, palm kernel oil, shea butter, or cocoa butter)

Plantain skins or cocoa pods

Double boiler

Distilled water

Essential oils, herbs or dried flowers (optional)

Soap molds



1. Select a base oil. Palm oil, palm kernel oil, shea butter, or
cocoa butter are traditionally used as base oils in Africa.

If using palm oil, you can extract it yourself by processing coconut
palms in a hand press. Since this is laborious work, and palms are
hard to come by in some regions, you can purchase palm oil that has
already been extracted.

The amount of base oil needed will vary depending on how much soap you
wish to make. The amount of oil used should not exceed half the capacity
of your double boiler. However, those who wish to make a larger amount
of soap generally process it in batches.

2. Oven roast the plantain skins. In order to ensure consistent texture,
oven roast or sun dry the plantain skins (or alternative ingredient).

3. Burn the plantain skins. Now, burn the plantain skins (or alternative
ingredients), creating an ash that will be leached to release its component
parts. Plantain skins are typically used in Africa, but plantains are rare
in many other countries. Soap makers typically replace them with cocoa pods,
palm tree leaves, or shea tree bark. Often, a combination of these ingredients
is used.

The amount of skins and pods needed will vary depending on how much soap you
are making and how concentrated you would like the black ingredients to be in
your soap.

The ashes contain potassium hydroxide, a precursor to many solid and liquid soaps.

4. Stir the ashes in water. Add the ashes to 2 cups of warm, distilled water and
stir until they are dissolved. •Add more ashes or water as needed until the liquid
is as dark and concentrated as you would like.

Bring the water to a boil, then lower the heat.

Once the ashes have dissolved completely, remove the ash/water mixture from heat,
and strain it through a fine strainer, setting aside the remnants.

5. Heat the base oil. Using a double boiler, heat the base oil over low heat until
it's melted and heated through.

6. Add the ash mixture. Pour the ashy liquid to the heated base oil, while stirring.
Add more ashy liquid until you achieve the desired shade of dark brown or black.
Continue stirring over low heat until the liquid is smooth.

7. Add a scent agent (optional). If desired, add drops of essential oil, such as
lavender, or dried plants, such as chamomile. Traditional African black soap does
not contain any additives, but some soap makers prefer to make their own scented
versions of the soap.

8. Remove liquid soap. As you continue stirring the mixture, a frothy, waxy substance
will begin to form at the surface. Scoop this liquid soap from the surface of the
double boiler as it forms, continuing until all the water has boiled off. Transfer it
into molds.

9. Cure the soap. The soap must be left in the molds for up to two weeks to cure. This
will allow the soap time to solidify before use. The finished product will be solid,
but malleable when pressed.



Tips

Black soap does not expire or decay over time.

Some prefer to cut or break pieces from the bar to bring into the bath or shower,
instead of getting the whole bar wet at one time.

Black soap should be stored on a dry surface.

Black soap tends to be softer than many other forms of soap, and it dissolves
easily when soaked in water.



How to Make Black Soap
http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Black-Soap



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SECTION 3



HOW TO MAKE
LIQUID BLACK
AFRICAN SOAP




Black soap is a traditional soap from Africa that is known for
its highly moisturizing properties. Black soap can be particularly
hydrating for extremely dry, aging or chapped skin. Black soap can
be used in brick or liquid form. Although you can buy black soap at
specialty bath shops, they can often be costly. One solution is to
make your own liquid black soap at home using the traditional
ingredients that are found in traditional African black soap.



Things You'll Need

Pot

Water

Chamomile flowers

Lavender flowers

Strainer

Black soap

Cocoa butter

Shea butter

Spoon

Jojoba oil

Sweet almond oil

Honey

Glycerin

Pump bottle



Instructions

1. Pour 4 cups of water into a pot.

2. Heat the water until it starts to boil.

3. Add in 3 tbsp. each of chamomile and lavender flowers.

4. Boil the flowers for four hours.

5. Strain out the flowers, and allow the mixture to cool completely.

6. Add in 6 oz. of black soap, 4 oz. of shea butter and 2 oz. of cocoa
butter. Mix well with a spoon.

7. Add in 2 oz. each of sweet almond oil and jojoba oil. Mix well.

8. Add in 2 oz. each of honey and glycerin. Mix well.

9. Pour the liquid black African soap into a pump bottle for use.



How to Make Liquid Black African Soap
http://www.ehow.com/how_7646787_make-liquid-black-african-soap.html



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SECTION 4



AFRICAN BLACK SOAP
RELATED TOPICS




How to Make an Organic Soap
http://www.ehow.com/how_2379731_make-own-organic-soap.html

About African Black Soap
http://www.ehow.com/about_5332331_african-black-soap.html

African Black Soap Recipes
http://www.ehow.com/way_5332113_african-black-soap-recipes.html

How to Make Your Own Dish Washing Liquid Soap
http://www.ehow.com/how_4733104_make-dish-washing-liquid-soap.html

Recipe for How to Make Soap With Shea Butter
http://www.ehow.com/how_6883435_recipe-make-soap-shea-butter.html

How to Make Liquid Soap
http://www.ehow.com/how_2067435_make-liquid-soap.html

How to Make Liquid Bath Soap
http://www.ehow.com/how_6296142_make-liquid-bath-soap.html

How to Rebatch African Black Soap
http://www.ehow.com/how_7733357_rebatch-african-black-soap.html

Homemade Shea Butter and Olive Oil Hair & Scalp Recipe
http://www.ehow.com/how_6883976_homemade-oil-hair-scalp-recipe.html

How to Make a Natural Cocoa Butter Body Lotion
http://www.ehow.com/how_2190180_make-natural-cocoa-butter-body.html

How to Make Liquid Hand Soap
http://www.ehow.com/how_9095_make-liquid-hand.html



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SECTION 5



AFRICAN BLACK SOAP
LINKS




African Black Soap
http://www.soapmakingfun.com/making-homemade-soap/african-black-soap.shtml

African Black Soap
http://www.soaprecipes101.com/homemade-soap-recipes/african-black-soap-recipe/

African Black Soap Salt Bar
http://www.lovinsoap.com/2014/04/african-black-soap-salt-bar/

DIY African Black Soap Shampoo Recipe
http://yournaturalhair.com/diy-african-black-soap-shampoo-recipe/

Formulating an african black soap recipe
http://www.skinandsoulcompany.com/african_black_soap_recipe.html

How to Make African Black Soap
http://www.abibitumikasa.com/forums/showthread.php/47367-How-to-Make-African-Black-Soap

How to Make Liquid Soap with African Black Soap
http://www.lovinsoap.com/2014/08/liquid-soap-with-african-black-soap/

How to make Moroccan black Beldi soap
http://wikitalks.com/2013/06/moroccan-black-beldi/

What is African black soap?
http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/natural-beauty-fashion/stories/what-is-african-black-soap



Everyday Guide
http://www.everydayguide.com/




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