ACTIVISM
ACTIVIST
SOCIAL ACTIVIST




THINK GLOBAL
ACT LOCAL




Whoever reports the news(media),
controls the news,
and sometimes history.




ACTIVISM

SOCIAL ACTIVISM

INTERNET ACTIVISM

WHAT IS INTERNET ACTIVISM

WHAT IS AN ACTIVIST

HOW TO BECOME AN ACTIVIST?

HOW TO BECOME AN INTERNET ACTIVIST?

WHAT IS AN ACTIVIST RELATED TOPICS

ADVOCACY TOOLS

12 STEPS HOW TO BECOME AN ACTIVIST

HOW DO I BECOME A COMMUNITY ACTIVIST?

ACTIVISM/ACTIVIST LINKS



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SECTION 1



ACTIVISM




Activism consists of efforts to promote, impede, or direct social, political,
economic, or environmental change. Activism can take a wide range of forms
from writing letters to newspapers or politicians, political campaigning,
economic activism such as boycotts or preferentially patronizing businesses,
rallies, street marches, strikes, sit-ins, and hunger strikes.

Some activists try to persuade people to change their behavior directly, rather
than to persuade governments to change or not to change laws. The cooperative
movement seeks to build new institutions which conform to cooperative principles,
and generally does not lobby or protest politically, and clergymen often exhort
their parishioners to follow a particular moral code or system.

As with those who engage other activities such as singing or running, the term
may apply broadly to anyone who engages in it even briefly, or be more narrowly
limited to those for whom it is a vocation, habit or characteristic practice.
In the narrower sense environmental activists that align themselves with Earth
First or Road Protestors would commonly be labelled activists, whilst a local
community fighting to stop their park or green being sold off or built on would
fit the broader application, due to their using similar means to similarly
conservative ends. In short activism is not always an action by Activists.



Activism
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Activism



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SECTION 2



SOCIAL
ACTIVISM




Social activism is an intentional action with the goal of bringing
about social change. If you feel strongly about a cause and are
working towards a change, you could be considered an activist.

An activist is anyone who is fighting for change in society.

An activist can be a student attending a rally against tuition increase,
a politician fighting against international human rights abuses or a
mother of a child killed by a drunk driver talking to students about
drinking and driving. Social activists consider the larger picture –
how can they find ways to end injustice and to create strong communities
which encourage economic, social and psychological health.

While social services work addresses the needs of individuals, social
action looks more at the root causes of those needs and tries to find
ways to eliminate them. For example, rather than working directly with
the homeless, a social activist might work to uncover the conditions
that are making it difficult for people to work and afford a place to
live. Instead of serving in a clinic that sees a high incidence of
leukemia, the social activist works to uncover the source of toxic
chemicals and to hold polluters accountable for the increased health
risks to a neighborhood.

If we define social justice as the belief in an equitable, compassionate
world where difference is understood, valued and respected, then we can
see that social activism and social justice are flip sides of the same
coin. Social action work is a way to meet the goal of social justice.



Social Activism
http://www.amherst.edu/campuslife/careers/students/picareers/careers/social_activism



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SECTION 3



INTERNET
ACTIVISM




Internet activism:

also known as

online activism,

digital campaigning,

digital activism,

online organizing,

electronic advocacy,

cyberactivism,

e-campaigning,

e-activism,



is the use of electronic communication technologies such as social media,
especially Twitter and Facebook, YouTube, e-mail, and podcasts for various
forms of activism to enable faster communications by citizen movements and
the delivery of local information to a large audience. Internet technologies
are used for cause-related fundraising, community building, lobbying, and
organizing.



Types


Awareness/advocacy,

organization/mobilization,

action/reaction.



Internet activism
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_activism



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SECTION 4



WHAT
IS
INTERNET
ACTIVISM?




Nonprofit organizations are notorious for being behind on technology
and changes in online communication methods. Between limited finances
and staff that are already spread pretty thin, it seems as though many
methods of communicating and providing information remain somewhat
stagnant.

Internet activism is a way for nonprofits to change these attitudes and
embrace the technological options available to them. It is basically the
antidote to the tried-and-true methods of fundraising, lobbying, and
garnering support.

It involves using online resources, websites, blogs, donation portals,
and email to generate interest in the organization.

There is some controversy over internet activism to date, since much
of it relates to insurgent and political groups. The typical internet
audience is pretty young in age, so it is easier to build a following
of eager, if not always educated, followers. Charismatic leaders can
reach a wide audience unaccustomed to doing research regarding where
and how their funding and support are going.

However, there are a number of benefits to internet activism for smaller
organizations looking to increase their visibility:


•Podcasts, blogs, and online press release venues are significantly cheaper
than print media.

•It is easier to reach a global audience. Traditional communication media
is focused on a narrow group of interested parties; internet communication
opens an organization to worldwide attention.

•Fundraising can occur with the click of a button. Payments made through
the internet are increasing in popularity in almost every field, including
the nonprofit sector. Instead of focusing on big-ticket donors, smaller
donations can add up quickly and with little effort.


Internet activism isn't a full-proof solution. Many audiences (typically
the elderly and lower socioeconomic groups) don't have equal access to
internet sources, and internet activism is fairly limited in the demographic
it reaches. However, when used in conjunction with traditional communication
methods, nonprofit organizations have much to gain.



What is Internet Activism?
http://www.nptechnews.com/tech-tips/what-is-internet-activism.html



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SECTION 5



WHAT
IS
AN
ACTIVIST?




An activist is someone who takes action in support of or opposition
to a cause. Activism can take a range of forms, from writing letters
to government representatives to organizing boycotts. Some activists
engage in radical or even illegal activity to further their ends,
while others prefer to stay within the boundaries of the law to win
more supporters to their causes. Every time someone writes a letter
to the editor, educates a friend about an issue, or phones an elected
official, he or she is participating in activism.

People have been practicing activism for centuries with the goal of
social and political change. Jesus Christ, for example, is considered
an activist by some, thanks to His radical preaching and fearless
approach to social reform. At various times in history, being an
activist has been quite dangerous, as activism was equated with
dangerous political dissent, making people who spoke out targets for
persecution. At other times, activism has been tolerated or even
encouraged.

On a lesser scale, activism might involve participating in activist
causes, without actively organizing. Examples like participating in
letter writing campaigns, phone banking for political candidates,
walking in marches, and supporting boycotts and strikes are all
examples of basic activism. Maybe activists start out at this level
before moving on to more active organization, which involves things
like leading marches, hosting organizing committees, community
organizing, offering classes at teach-ins, and so forth.



What is an Activist?
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-an-activist.htm



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SECTION 6



HOW
TO
BECOME
AN
ACTIVIST?




Becoming an activist in your community or for a cause you feel strongly
about can be rewarding. Getting paid to make a difference as an activist
can be a great way to make a living. Although jobs where you can be an
activist may not be the easiest thing to find they are out there.



Instructions


1. Consider what's going on in your community.

Certain communities may be dealing with particular issues such as
environmental concerns or problems with crime or the educational
system. Read local newspapers and pay close attention to news
reports. View crime statistics for your community online.



2. Network in your community.

Attend fund-raising events involving organizations and causes you
are interested in. Introduce yourself to program directors. Consider
joining the chamber or commerce in your town and attend functions.
Work on political campaigns for candidates you believe in. Getting
to know people who are active in your community may help you with
job leads.



3. Go national.

Many national organizations need activists at their main headquarters.
Other organizations have branches in communities across the country.
For example, the National Organization for Women and the American
Cancer Society have both regional and national offices and may need
people to work as activists. Contact both local and national programs
to find job openings.



4. Work as an intern.

Many organizations that need activists use interns. Some internships
pay an entry level salary or a small stipend. Call organizations you
are interested in and ask about internship possibilities. Keep in
mind accepting an internship that does not pay may be a good way to
gain experience and get a foot in the door.



Tips & Warnings


Make a list of your transferable skills. Activists may need to campaign
for legislation, write press releases and put together fund-raisers.
Determine what skills you have from your education or past employment
that would help you as an activist.



How to Become an Activist?
http://www.ehow.com/how_3392024_become-activist.html#ixzz2IuhrNJOc



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SECTION 7



HOW
TO
BECOME
AN
INTERNET
ACTIVIST




So you want to take your activism online? The allure of
Internet activism is in the simplicity that the Internet
adds to communications. The Internet erases all kinds of
"leg work" in campaigns that we might call "activist." A
lot of the nuts and bolts of activism are different online,
and as more and more of human activity goes onto the web,
it's a "no-brainer" that activism will follow.



Instructions


1. Set up a great web page.

For a true activist, your page should be the best possible to advance
your cause. Don't settle for mediocrity; use the values of the web
(bright colors and attention-grabbing headlines) to get people focused
on your campaign.



2. Link your webpage to others.

Find the best examples of other similar pages online and link to them
prominently on your budding activist site. Do your best to find your
"comrades" or colleagues online, and your web activism will thrive.



3. Use features like guestbooks
to do the work of a campaign,
including petitions.


Keep a record of those who have signed on to support you.


4. Use chat rooms.

Everybody, from celebrities and famous politicians to relatively obscure
bloggers and activists are using chat rooms to advance their views and
mingling with others online for frank discussions of current events. Chat
rooms are a way to get solid contact with others online. Plan a way to
connect at specific times, for online "meetings" on your subject.



5. Get things rolling.

You can use the above items, like chat room meetings, to do fund-raising,
or to arrange and advertise events in your area. Bringing online activism
across to the offline world will only energize your web activism. You'll
find the combination of the two will create a good overall campaign and
possibly even get your name into the mainstream press.



How to Be an Internet Activist?
http://www.ehow.com/how_2096603_be-internet-activist.html#ixzz2IukrgK7n



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SECTION 8



HOW
TO
BE
AN
ACTIVIST
RELATED
TOPICS




How to Create a Girl Activist Group
http://www.ehow.com/how_8430250_create-girl-activist-group.html

How to Become a Lobbyist
http://www.ehow.com/how_2061886_become-lobbyist.html

How to Be an Environmental Activist
http://www.ehow.com/how_2093938_be-environmental-activist.html

How to Be an Internet Activist
http://www.ehow.com/how_2096603_be-internet-activist.html

How to Be an Animal Activist or Advocate
http://www.ehow.com/how_2052658_be-animal-activist.html

How to Become a Conservative Political Activist
http://www.ehow.com/how_8635174_become-conservative-political-activist.html

How to Become a Wildlife Conservation Activist
http://www.ehow.com/how_4539916_become-wildlife-conservation-activist.html

How to Be a Political Activist
http://www.ehow.com/how_2057737_be-political-activist.html

Careers in Political Activism
http://www.ehow.com/info_7759484_careers-political-activism.html

How to Become a Gay Activist
http://www.ehow.com/how_2308352_become-gay-activist.html

Child Rights Activists
http://www.ehow.com/info_8381843_child-rights-activists.html

Qualifications for Community Organizers
http://www.ehow.com/info_8680623_qualifications-community-organizers.html

How to Plan a Social Event
http://www.ehow.com/how_8220140_plan-social-event.html

Careers in Animal Rights
http://www.ehow.com/list_6521283_careers-animal-rights.html

Green Matters
http://www.greenmatters.com/

How to Be a Peace Activist
http://www.ehow.com/how_8607285_peace-activist.html

How to Become a Political Advisor
http://www.ehow.com/how_2077543_become-political-advisor.html



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SECTION 9



ADVOCACY
TOOLS




Application Service Providers


A number of for-profit companies provide readymade software
systems for activists, non-profits, or political campaigns
to manage their activist database online.

The systems have different feature sets, but each provide a
combination of Web page management, email list management,
and member database management. The systems often include
ready-to-go, updated contact information for U.S. state or
national officials. Some systems can also synchronize with
an organizations donor database to allow targeted email
messages to donors who match certain criteria.

When users input your zip code, their elected officials are
identified, you can fax or email the text of a sample letter,
or customize it.

In my opinion, the most powerful feature is the ability to
email users based on their zip code. Using this, one can
target key Congressional districts before a vote.

These systems are maintained on the companies; own servers,
and can be managed and customized via a Web based interface.
While some services may be available to very small non-profits
at little or no cost, set-up and monthly fees often add up to
tens of thousands of dollars per year.

Companies offering these services in the U.S. include:



Blue State Digital, LLC
http://www.bluestatedigital.com/

Convio
http://Blue State Digital, LLCwww.convio.com/

Capitol Advantage
http://capitoladvantage.com/

Get Active
http://www.getactive.com/

Groundspring
http://www.groundspring.org

Grassroot.com
http://www.grassroot.com/

I Stand For
http://www.istandfor.com/

Kintera, Inc.
http://www.kintera.com/

Right Click
http://www.rcsinteractive.com/


Each provides a different feature set and data set. Most specialize
in Congressional lobbying, while some maintain lists of State and
local officials and media contacts. Some companies may be more
willing than others to customize their services to your campaign;
specific needs.



Organizers Database
http://organizenow.net/odb/odb.php

is a membership database program for Windows designed for small
organizations to keep track of activist members or donors.



Congress.org
http://www.congress.org/

is a public service offered by Capitol Advantage useful for
lobbying members of Congress by fax or email via a Web interface.


The Petition Site
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/

Petition Online offer free electronic petition hosting to anyone
with an email address. The latter currently hosts petitions in a
variety of languages.


my Society
http://mysociety.org/

has developed several free, open source applications enabling
citizens to lobby and track their elected officials.


Fax Your MP.org
http://faxyourmp.org/

lets Britons fax their Members of Parliament for free. The site
was set up by volunteers because Parliament did not offer such a service.



Advocacy Tools
http://www.backspace.com/action/advocacy_tools.php



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SECTION 10



12
STEPS
HOW
TO
BECOME
AN
ACTIVIST




Activists are people who see the need for change, improvement, and motivation
on a large scale. They are people driven by passion, keen to share facts they
want understood more widely, and led by a vision for a better future. Activism
comes naturally to some, while for others, it's something that is thrust upon
them as a result of particular experiences or upon learning about something
they passionately believe needs to change.

Whatever your reason for wanting to become an activist, you have the ability to
do so no matter your age, your means, or your background. Having the belief that
you can make a difference and that you have the power to do something about an
issue are at the heart of creating change for the better.




Things You'll Need


Background information on the cause

Activism books

Resources (time, money, goods)

Internet access




Steps


1. Establish what you can do for your cause.

2. Source your passion.

3. Be realistic about your own needs.

4. Read books about activism.

5. Choose your method of activism.

6. Research existing efforts.

7. Get organized!

8. Learn how to message effectively.

9. Get the message out.

10. Expect dissent.

11. Don't work yourself into the ground.

12. Reflect on how you can sustain change.




Tips


Be creative! Activism doesn't have to involve large events. Bloggers can be activists through
their writing, teachers can be activists by encouraging students to challenge their beliefs,
artists can leave guerrilla activist art around town, computer-savvy folks can arrange an
e-zine, etc.

Consider using merchandise for additional fundraising if your activism takes the form of a
large event. You can have t-shirts made, do a bake sale, or sell related books on the issue
you're addressing.

Learn how to raise money. Though of course you can do activism on your own dime, there are
few kinds of activism that don't require any money whatsoever. Artists need supplies,
bloggers need hosting plans, lone protesters need signs. Some forms of activism might even
attract grant money, if you know how to write a proposal.

Strong organization from the top down (or the bottom up) will ensure that everything runs
smoothly. Don't forget to document your steps, adjust your plans as time goes by, and
communicate frequently.

When working with others, consider the needs of the group. Be willing to compromise on the
details, if not on your core values.




Warnings


Be aware of the consequences if you plan to engage in activities of civil disobedience.
Carry a lawyer's business card if you believe that you may be arrested. In the USA, the
ACLU makes pocket cards for this purpose.

Watch out for discrimination within activist circles. Unfortunately, it is all too common
that individuals fighting for one issue will act from a position of privilege on another.
Examples of this include sexism in a gay rights group and racism among white feminists.
Never allow racism, sexism, misogyny, homophobia, ableism, etc. to develop unchecked in
a group. Keep the needs of others in mind, and listen with an open mind to concerns you
hadn't considered. Make your events accessible and read up on how to create a safe space
if you're not familiar with this concept.



How to Become an Activist
http://www.wikihow.com/Become-an-Activist



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SECTION 11



HOW
DO
I
BECOME
A
COMMUNITY
ACTIVIST?




Become an Activist


Becoming an activist in your community or for a cause you are feeling
positively about can be very, very gratifying. Getting paid to make a
difference as an activist can be a great way to make a living, but this
is only a case some of the time, you really must have a love to change
things for the better. Although jobs where you can be an activist may
not be the easiest thing to find, if you become an activist chances are
you start for the love of change and helping others.But if you follow
the steps to below to become an activist, you could make money for it.




Instructions


1. Consider what's going on in your community.

Certain communities may be dealing with particular issues such as
environmental concerns or problems with crime or the educational
system. Read local newspapers and pay close attention to news
reports. View crime statistics for your community online.



2. Get out in your community and the communities around you.

Attend fund-raising events involving organizations and things you
are interested in. Introduce yourself to programs. Consider joining
the commerce in your town and attend town hall functions. Work on
political campaigns for candidates who favor things that you are
also interested in. Getting to know people who are active in your
community may help you with job leads and get your name out their.
Attend any rallies and pack things to make it easier for everyone
such as sandwiches, drinks, signs, blankets, etc.



3. Do things outside of your community.

Many larger organizations need activists at their main headquarters.
Other organizations have branches in communities across the country.
For example, the National Organization for Women and the American
Cancer Society have both regional and national offices and may need
people to work as activists. Contact both local and national programs
to find job openings.



4. Try to Work as an intern.


Some places that need activists use interns. Many internships pay an
good starting salary. Call organizations you are interested in and
ask about internship possibilities and chances to work. Keep in mind
accepting an internship that does not pay may be a good way to gain
experience and get some recognition. Remember if your intention for
doing this is pay, I would suggest something else, since this is for
people who love to help others and change negative community issues
into positive ones!




Tips


•Make a list of your transferable skills.


Activists may need to campaign for legislation, write press releases
put together fund-raisers, make cold calls, put up flyers, and much
more. Determine what skills you have from your past employment that
would help you as a community activist. Present these skills to any
potential organizations and ask how you can be utilitized!



How do I become a community activist?
http://brandonwyse.hubpages.com/hub/How-do-I-become-a-community-activist



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SECTION 12



ACTIVISM
ACTIVIST
LINKS




Activism
http://www.aynrand.org/site/PageServer?pagename=participate_arc_activism

Activism - Online Petition
http://www.activism.com/en_US/

Activist education
http://www.thechangeagency.org/01_cms/details.asp?ID=36

Activist Post
http://www.activistpost.com/

Become a Community Activist
http://www.au.org/get-involved/activism

Become a Community Activist
http://www.ec-online.net/forms/formactivist.htm

Change.org
https://www.change.org/

Color Of Change
http://www.colorofchange.org/about/

Community Activism
http://www.communitygroup.co.uk/community-activism.html

The Daily Activist
http://www.thedailyactivist.com/

EMILY's List
http://emilyslist.org/

Fat Grrrl Activism
http://fat-grrrl-activism.tumblr.com/post/41202447282/a-while-ago-i-was-drawing-a-picture-of-a-girl-and

The Guardian
https://www.theguardian.com/us

INDECLINE
http://thisisindecline.com/

Internet activism
http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Internet_activism

Internet activism
http://mediagirl.org/social-tags/internet-activism

Internet Activism
http://www.learnthenet.com/learn-about/internet-activism/index.php

An Introduction to Activism on the Internet
http://www.backspace.com/action/all.php

Maajid Nawaz
http://maajidnawaz.com/

National Action Network | No Justice, No Peace
http://nationalactionnetwork.net/

Organizing for Action
http://my.barackobama.com/page/s/organizing-for-action

Quotes About Activism
http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/activism

Social Activism Meetup Groups
http://social-activism.meetup.com/

Tulsa Reale state Fund
http://www.tulsarealestatefund.com/

What it means to be a "community activist
http://saveourcommunity.us/?q=node/689

Youth-Led Social Activism
http://www.freechild.org/youth_activism_2.htm



ACTIVIST INDEX

COMMUNITY INDEX

ACTIVISM RESOURCES

ACTIVIST

DIVIDE AND CONQUER

THE PARADOXICAL COMMANDMENTS


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